CNOtes – March 19, 2019 – Essay Contest Winners

Phather Phil’s Prayer

Heavenly Father too many times we venture into the dark waters of life. We find ourselves treading water with no relief in sight, it is then that we turn to You for help. Your love for us provides the bridge over the troubled waters and puts us back on the road You intended us to walk. The static of the world sidetracks us too often. Help us to turn off the worlds temptations and stay with You in the fullness of our faith. By consistently staying with You, we can avoid the bargain basement temptations that dot our paths and led the young people in an optimistic way of life. Amen!

Today’s Guests

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Special Announcement

Donna Huss announced that the next NOW event will be Tuesday, March 26th at St. Leonard’s Station House. This event will be held from 5-6:30 pm for the residents of St. Leonard. NOW is an acronym for “New Optimists Welcome”. Read more about it here.

Upcoming Social Events
4/1/2019, 6 PM Trivia party run by Scott Hall of @HallAroundTown at Chappy’s Social House

5/4/2019, Kentucky Derby Party at Remodeling Designs in Miamisburg

5/11/2019, Dayton Dragons game in a luxury box

Committee Announcements

Pat Behn announced that we need volunteers to help stuff Easter eggs on April 13, 2019 at 9 AM at St Leonard’s restaurant. The actual Easter egg hunt will be April 20, 2019 and will be held on the grounds at St. Leonard’s.

Gary Hansen and Diane Arehart will be chairing a new committee called the Engagement/Activation/Retention Committee.  The objective is to ensure that our new members become engaged quickly and, therefore, choose to stay in our club.  You can join the committee or choose to be a mentor to a new member.  If you are interested, plan to attend our next meeting on Thursday, April 4, at 5:30pm at Panera Bread in downtown Centerville.  Reach out to Gary Hansen or Diane Arehart for more information.

Annual Essay Contest

Kelly George, the CNO club chair of the Optimist International Essay Contest, explained the contest to us. Fifteen essays were submitted to CNO. She thanked this year’s volunteer judges of the essays: Debe Dockins, Glenn George, and Evelyn Griffin.

Kelly will be the chairman at the district level next year, so our club is looking for a new chair for the next year. Let her know if you want to volunteer.

Seventy clubs participate in this in Ohio. One winner from each club will compete at the state level and the winner at the state level will receive a $3500 scholarship ($2500 from Optimist International and $1000 from The Great Ohio District of OI).

The top 3 essays were read today. The scoring was very close. Out of 300 possible points, only 6 points separated 3rd to second and only 8 points from 2nd to 1st.

The topic for the 2018-19 school year is: “When All the World’s Problems are Solved, is Optimism Still Necessary?”

Emily Whitehead, a Senior at CHS, took third place. Emily received a Youth appreciation award from CNO in November, 2019. Receiving this award inspired her to write her essay.

Emily read us her essay. Excerpts from her essay follow:

Optimism is a proactive lifestyle. As a band member at CHS and using optimism she helped fellow student Sarah who has Down’s syndrome learn to play the saxophone. She tutors students from third grade through high school. To help them succeed she gets them to replace the words “I can’t” with “I can”.

Benjamin Thomas, a senior at CHS, took second place. Benjamin could not attend today’s lunch and Kelly George read his essay to us. Excerpts from his essay follow:

Galileo Galilee championed the Scientific Method. Galileo wrote a book that condemned himself to a life sentence of house arrest. He optimistically believed it was the right thing to do. Throughout history optimism has allowed the world to lift itself by its boot straps.

There must be a belief in progress to make progress.

Optimism is the ability to believe in a better future.  Optimism is difficult, messy and painful, but it is necessary to push society forward. Even in a perfect world, optimism is necessary to maintain perfection.

Madelyn Thomas, a Freshman at CHS took first place and she will participate at the district level. Excerpts from her essay follow:

Humanists brought a new way to view the world. There needs to be a shared spirit of ingenuity. It takes hard work and a strong sense of optimism. You must believe you are capable of a discovery to make discoveries.

If a perfect world with no problems were to exist, this would make everyone lazy, and this then is a problem. Optimism solves this paradox, by believing you can make a perfect world better.

Optimism can still create innovation in a perfect world. Innovation and improvement are necessary in a Utopian world to give a driving force to the human race. Without optimism the world would collapse. Optimism is the infrastructure to keep a perfect world perfect.

Thank you to our three contestants and their families for sharing their essays with our club.

Birthdays

Member Birthday
Dana Dring March 20
Larry England March 20
Shane Wilken March 20
Andy Dickerson March 21
Bryan Miller March 21
Sara Hemmeter March 21
Tom Novak March 23
John Kalaman March 25
Steve Blake March 25

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Joan Cordonnier March 22 3/22/2008 11
Jeff Brown March 25 3/25/2015 4

New Member Readings and Inductions

Name Sponsor 1st 2nd 3rd Reading or Induction
Bob Crawford Nick Tarkany 3rd Reading
Amy Blakeman Ron Tinnerman 3rd Reading
William Pace Jean Pummill 1st Reading

Sergeants at Arms

No time for sergeants this week.

 Happy Bucks! 

No time for happy bucks this week.

CNOtes – March 12, 2019 – Muse Machine

Phather Phil’s Prayer

Heavenly Father we have called upon You many times to help us slow down in our run thru life. Yet, we continue to keep our shoulder to the wheel and do our best to be the early bird that gets the worm. The beauty You have created for us goes largely unnoticed. We need to remember also, that it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese. We need to realize that all of Jesus’s accomplishments were done at about 3 mph. Thank You for all our blessings and let us follow You Son’s example on getting er done by not putting the pedal to the metal. Amen!

Today’s Guests

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Special Announcement

Donna Huss announced that the next NOW event will by Tuesday, March 26th at St. Leonard’s Station House. This event will be held from 5-6:30 pm for the residents of St. Leonard. NOW is an acronym for “New Optimists Welcome”. Read more about it here.

Upcoming Social Events

4/1/2019, 6 PM Trivia party run by Scott Hall of @HallAroundTown at Chappy’s Social House

5/4/2019, Kentucky Derby Party at Remodeling Designs in Miamisburg

5/11/2019, Dayton Dragons game in a luxury box

Happy Birthday to Morgan Schiffhauer

Today was Morgan Schiffhauer’s Birthday! We gave her the honor of singing her “Happy Birthday”! She was very enthusiastic about the notably horrible rendition of the classic tune. She even gave two happy bucks! She said, “The singing of ‘Happy Birthday’ was horrible, but it’s the thought that counts.”

Committee Announcements

Jerry Stahley is selling raffle tickets for the OI Junior Golf Championship. The price is 6 Tickets for $5 and the prize is a case of wine. Tickets will be available for the next couple of months.

Stan Franzaglia, Childhood Cancer Committee, said the next Build-A-Bear will be early May, 2019.

Greg Fay stated that the next Optimist 2.0 meeting is March 21, 2019, 4 PM, at Heavier Than Air Brewing Company. It starts earlier than normal so you can enjoy the basketball tournament.

Mike Bevis, Golf Committee, said the golf tournament will be Monday, July 15, 2019. The next meeting will be March 20, 2019 at Buckeye Home Health Care.

Rosalie Catalano from the Muse Machine

Mike Bevis introduced Rosalie Catalano, the Director of Development of Muse Machine. The mission of the Muse Machine is to, “Change the lives of young people through the arts.” On their website the About page states, “Muse Machine is a nationally celebrated arts education organization serving more than 76,800 students and their teachers each year throughout central and southwestern Ohio and Kentucky since 1982. For most students, Muse will create “a-ha!” moments by suggesting imaginative bridges to curriculum. Many will use Muse to discover culture that may have seemed out of reach. Still others will explore their own creative paths through Muse. And all will benefit by the presence of enthusiastic, innovative teachers in their classrooms.”

Rosalie Catalano showed and discussed a slide show that you can view here.

Muse Machine was founded by Suzy Bassani. The Suzy Bassani Theater Off Third is still open, and she is still active in an unofficial capacity.

Students served are from Pre-K through 12. They believe the arts should be available to all children. They help 76000+ students in 108 schools in 13 counties in Ohio and Kentucky. They target Title 1 schools. A Title 1 school is one where at least 40% of students receive free or reduced-price lunches. There has been a dramatic increase in recent years of students receiving these benefits. They serve nearly all the Title 1 schools in the area.

The Six Focus Areas of Muse are:

  • In-School Performances
  • Out-of-School Performances
  • Workshops and Road Trips
  • Muse Machine Productions
  • Elementary Residencies
  • Teacher Development

In-School performances include performances by Dayton Opera, The Human Race Theatre Company, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company and more.

Out-of-School performances provide opportunities to attend shows from Broadway tours and other top-level performances at a discounted rate. Venues include Schuster Center, Victoria Theatre and the Loft Theatre.

If a child’s school does not participate in Muse, any child can apply online including home schooled children.

Recently children had an opportunity to take a bus to Chicago to see the play “Hamilton”.

They have expanded the pre-school and elementary offerings to include activities in the summer in addition to the regular school year. A recent workshop for 1st graders was called, “It is all about the money honey.” They learned basic economics, the purpose of money, manufacturing and more.

Kids learn self-confidence and inclusion. As many as 300 kids try out for the annual musical. They learn accountability and time management because they must show up for rehearsals for 3 months. Last January they performed the play, “Hello Dolly.”

Every year there is a week-long seminar in New York. Teachers attend a diverse array of performances and arts events. They meet with producers and actors and brainstorm ways to integrate new ideas into their own classrooms. Each teacher is required to create a lesson plan from their experience. Muse for educators helped teacher earn 2000 hours of continuing education credits.

Over $700,000 of Muse’s $1.3 Million annual budget comes from: individuals, corporations and small businesses, civic groups, foundations and foundation grants, and government grants.

The Muse Machine website has a lot of information about what they do, including calendars and a bunch of lesson plans for teachers to use whenever they want. Donations can be made here.

A recent grant from the National Endowment for the Arts will allow them to put on a multi-cultural show at the Loft in downtown Dayton.

Rosalie Catalano invited any of us to come see an in-school performance. She said to just give her a call, her contact information is on the website. Thank you, Rosalie, for the uplifting and informational presentation.

Birthdays

Member Birthday
Morgan Schiffhauer March 12
Gareth Dickey March 14
Vida McDowell March 15
Bob Foster March 16
Brian Nolan March 16
David Brookman March 18

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Bob Glavin March 12 3/12/1993 26
Shane Wilken March 14 3/14/2003 16
Steve Kohls March 14 3/14/2003 16

New Member Readings and Inductions

Name Sponsor 1st 2nd 3rd Reading or Induction
Brandon Barrett Jesse Gaither 3rd Reading
Bob Crawford Nick Tarkany 2nd Reading
Amy Blakeman Ron Tinnerman 2nd Reading

Sergeants at Arms

Member Infraction
Greg Fay For back talking the Sergeant John Thompson
Judy DeMarco Took all Sergeant’s change for 50/50 tickets
Joe Madden Wearing same sweatshirt as Ronald Kuker
Ronald Kuker Wearing same sweatshirt as Joe Madden
Pete Rife Late to meeting
Renee Glenn Late to meeting
Greg Fay Introducing Scott Langer’s guest
Scott Langer Not introducing his guest
Charlie Goodwin Phone rang during meeting
Paulette Novak Here today, but not showing up often enough at CNO lunch meetings

 Happy Bucks! 

Member Reason
Donna Huss Thanks for the appreciative comments about the meals and the job she is doing as president.
Melissa DeShurko First grandchild was just born.
Nick Tarkany Second grandchild is on the way, a girl.
Morgan Schiffhauer Thanks for everyone wishing her a happy birthday at today’s meeting.
Morgan Schiffhauer The singing of “Happy Birthday” was horrible, but it’s the thought that counts.
Art Hung Ed Case is in the house.
Joan Cordonnier Middle of track season and she needs temp and permanent employees.

CNOtes – March 5, 2019 – David Jablonski – Dayton Daily News Sports

Today’s Guests

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Special Announcement

Donna Huss announced that the next NOW event will by Tuesday, March 26th at St. Leonard’s Station House. This event will be held from 5-6:30 pm for the residents of St. Leonard. NOW is an acronym for “New Optimists Welcome”. Read more about it here.

Upcoming Social Events

4/1/2019, Trivia party run by Scott Hall of @HallAroundTown

5/4/2019, Kentucky Derby Party at Remodeling Designs in Miamisburg

5/11/2019, Dayton Dragons game in a luxury box

Committee Announcements

Scott Langer announced that Tri-Star basketball will be on March 16, 2019 at Watts Middle school.

Jerry Stahley is selling raffle tickets for OI Junior Golf Championship. The price is 6 Tickets for $5 and the prize is a case of wine. Tickets will be available for the next couple of months.

Today’s Speaker – David Jablonski

Debe Dockins introduced today’s speaker David Jablonski.

From Debe:
David Jablonski covers the Dayton Flyers, Ohio State Buckeyes football, the Cincinnati Reds and Wittenberg University sports for the Dayton Daily News, Springfield News-Sun, Journal News and WHIO. He graduated from Fayetteville High School in 1995 and the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University in 1999. He completed internships at the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, the South Bend Tribune and the Scripps Howard News Service and worked at the Vero Beach (Fla.) Press Journal for two years in his first job after college before returning to Ohio in 2001 to work at the News-Sun. He was born in Toledo, Ohio, and grew up in Mount Orab, Ohio.

David is from Mt. Orab, but his parents are from the Dayton area. His grandfather was a dean at UD. He saw many UC games as a teen because his father went there.

He covered local sports in Springfield, Ohio from 2001 -2012. In 2013 he was moved to cover University of Dayton Sports, Cincinnati Reds, and The Ohio State University. His primary focus is the Dayton Flyers.

While watching the game he takes about 1500 photos. His wife is a photographer for the Columbus Dispatch and she taught him enough to do his own photography. He has a special mount on his camera to hold his smartphone that he uses to capture video.

He goes to every single Flyers game, so he has visited multiple east coast cities. He arranges his own travel. He, his wife and their newborn child appreciate not traveling with the team because the team usually travels a day ahead of time. He can be home about 28 hours after leaving his home in Columbus.

He likes covering sports from the field of play. It is a lot more exciting being on the field and he gets to do this with the Flyers, Reds and OSU.

He fielded several questions from people attending lunch.

Thanks for speaking today David Jablonski!

Birthdays

No birthdays this week.

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Barbara Santo March 9 3/9/1999 20

New Member Readings and Inductions

Name Sponsor 1st 2nd 3rd Reading or Induction
Tim Bemis Greg Fay Induction
Kyle Bergsman Barbara Santo Induction
Terri Leputa Julie Walling Noeth Induction
Brandon Barrett Jesse Gaither 2nd Reading
Bob Crawford Nick Tarkany 1st Reading
Amy Blakeman Ron Tinnerman 1st Reading

Sergeants at Arms

Member Infraction
John Kalaman Wearing Mardi Gras beads
Tom Novak Vacationing in Florida
Gary Aiken Vacationing in Hawaii
Gail Aiken Vacationing in Hawaii
Candace Rinke Late to meeting
Bill Willliams Leaving door open and freezing the Sergeants
Tim Clemmer Leaving door open and freezing the Sergeants
Scott Langer Late to meeting
Joe Madden Missing too many lunches! Welcome back!

 Happy Bucks! 

Member Reason
Joe Madden Happy to be at lunch. Thank you everyone for the support while he was in the hospital.
Mary Madden Happy Joe is at lunch.
Gail Aiken Grandson Born Jan 2, 2019.
Myron Rheaume Grandson Liam Hatton a Freshman on the Springboro HS varsity hockey team named first team all conference and is an Ohio first team hockey academic scholar athlete.
Bob Collins 55th wedding anniversary with Karen Collins!
Tom Kendo Glad Joe Madden was at today’s meeting.
Jay McAlpine Caribbean vacation to celebrate his and Kathy’s 45th wedding anniversary.

CNOtes – February 26, 2019 – Jessica Barry – Modern College of Design

Today’s Guests

Guest Guest Of
Jessica Barry Speaker
Amy Blakeman Ron Tinnerman
John Decker Paul Stull
Dylan Melling Paul Stull
Becca Orebaugh Donna Huss

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Pat Behn Receives Optimist Hall of Fame Award

Tom Kendo, the immediate past governor of the Great Ohio District, was a guest today. He presented CNO member Pat Behn with the Optimist Hall of Fame Award. Pat Behn has been a member since 2003 and is very deserving of this, the highest honor presented by Optimist International. Thank you Pat Behn for everything you have done, do and will do!

Pat Behn’s Birthday

Pat Behn’s Birthday was today so Charlie Tapp led us in singing Happy Birthday to Pat as only we can. If the goal is to show how much we appreciate the birthday honoree by singing as far off key as possible, then we obviously love Pat Behn a LOT!

Today’s Presentation about the Modern College of Design.

Bill Williams introduced today’s speaker, Jessica Barry, the President, Owner and a graduate of The Modern College of Design (aka “The Modern”). She grew up in Versailles, Ohio. She graduated from The Modern in 1987. She became its president in 2007 and purchased the school from founder Tim Potter in 2013.

Jessica presented to us the history, mission and vision of The Modern.

The Modern, (originally called The School of Advertising Art,) was founded in 1983 by Tim Potter and is located on David Road in Kettering. It is a nationally recognized college for design. About a year ago they moved to their current 23,000 square foot location. Since moving they have added 17 more employees. The Dayton Business Journal named The Modern College of Design as the 2018 overall Business of the Year.

About 30% of the students are from the local area. The other 70% are from all over including as far away as California. Social media has helped spread the word about The Modern. The Modern helps its students find housing in Kettering. Local business owners in the area appreciate how many students the school brings to the area as they need young, reliable workers to work in their local businesses.

The Modern is a microcosm of a larger University. They currently have 200 students. Even though they have a lot fewer students than a typical college, they offer all the expected services such as financial aid and scholarships. Classes generally have 12-20 students, but never more than 20 students.

Currently there are 1400 alumni and the job placement rate ranges from 93-100%, with 90% of graduates finding jobs in Dayton, Cincinnati and Columbus. Others who have left the area have landed prestigious jobs at well-known companies like Apple and Nike.

The Modern offers an associate degree that can be completed in two years. Graduates are ready for entry level jobs after the fast-paced curriculum. Design skills learned include web-based languages such as CSS and HTML.

The Modern is finishing the process of being approved to offer a bachelor’s degree. The program focuses on helping students become entrepreneurs. They learn leadership and strategies to form a business in addition to learning design.

Curriculum Areas Include

  • Graphic Design
  • Web Design, for both mobile and desktop
  • UI/UX (User interface and user experience)
  • Video
  • Photography
  • Motion Design (essentially 2D design)
  • Illustration by hand and computer
  • Marketing (teaches the strategy for why the designs are made)

Their vision is to create students that are passionate about their work and work with integrity.

Looking ahead Jessica said they need to hire more professors. Now, because of the bachelor’s program, The Modern needs to teach more math and science and they need professors to do this. They now have enough students that they are working on building their first dorm to help with first year housing.

Birthdays

Member Birthday
Blanca Ortiz February 26
John Sherman February 26
Pat Behn February 26
Aaron Campbell February 28
Joan Cordonnier February 28
Rachel Goetz March 02
Tim Clemmer March 02
Tim Stull March 02
Greg Fay March 03
Ryan Fay March 04

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Chris Ziehler February 26 2/26/2017 2
Jane Fiehrer February 27 2/27/1998 21
Judy DeMarco February 27 2/27/1998 21
Dick Stevens February 28 2/28/2001 18
Kelly Stone February 28 2/28/2001 18

New Member Readings and Inductions

Name Sponsor 1st 2nd 3rd Reading or Induction
Doug Reno Carolyn Taylor Induction
Ron Thompson Jean Pummill Induction
Jordan Feldkamp Cindy Harris 3rd Reading
Tim Bemis Greg Fay 3rd Reading
Kyle Bergsman Barbara Santo 3rd Reading
Terri Leputa Julie Walling Noeth 3rd Reading
Brandon Barrett Jesse Gaither 1st Reading

Sergeants at Arms

Member Infraction
Nancy Lehren Late to meeting
Ron Thompson Grabbed Ron Tinnerman’s name badge
Greg Fay Buying 4 50/50 tickets for 4 dollars instead of 7 tickets for $5
Paul Stull Buying 4 50/50 tickets for 4 dollars instead of 7 tickets for $5
Doug Reno Couldn’t find his badge
Bob Collins For having an issue getting his to go box of seafood fettuccine home intact

 Happy Bucks! 

Member Reason
Bill Stone $5 for 5 year wedding anniversary to Kelly Stone
Debe Dockins Thankful the library employs a graduate of the Modern College of Design
Donna Huss Husband inducted in the Centerville H.S. Athletic Hall of Fame 2/15
Pat Behn Thanks to the district for awarding her the Optimist Hall of Fame Award
Vida McDowell Thank you Diane and Patrick Arehart for hosting the wine and beer social last Saturday
Jean Pummill Thank you Diane and Patrick Arehart for hosting the wine and beer social last Saturday
Tom Kendo For the Centerville Noon Optimists being such a great club
Myron Rheame Granddaughter Keara has been selected by the faculty of the Digital Arts Consortium at University of Cincinnati to captain the inter collegiate film competition team where she will oversee production and directing

CNOtes – Optimist 2.0 February 21, 2019 – Bill DeFries – Author of Beyond the Bounds – Explosive Success for Atypical People

ALL PHOTOS FROM THE MEETING ARE HERE

Welcome NEW Club Members!

We inducted four new members at tonight’s meeting and we are so happy to have these folks step up to help us help kids!  Welcome to the largest Optimist Club in the world!

Name Sponsor
Katie Calloway Gary Hansen
Cheryl Dowd Joan Cordonnier
Ashley Simeone Emily Duke
Jordan Feldkamp Cindy Harris

Guests and Members in Attendance

Name Member/Guest
Jendaya Herbert Guest
Josh Panczyk Guest
David Stone Guest
Jim Ehrensberger Guest
Walt Harrison Guest
Mark Karns Guest
Joe Poelking Guest
Rafael Santillan Guest
Nan Zanawick Guest
Nicole Zanawick Guest
Paul Zanawick Guest
Nancy Anderson Member
Pat Arehart Member
Pat Behn Member
Katie Calloway Member
Wayne Christie Member
Bob Collins Member
Joan Cordonnier Member
Mike Cordonnier Member
Bill DeFries Member
Judy DeMarco Member
Cheryl Dowd Member
Jordan Feldkamp Member
Stan Fronzaglia Member
Cindy Gaboury Member
Jesse Gaither Member
Rachel Goetz Member
Cindy Harris Member
Brian Miller Member
Valorie Murray Member
Laurie Poeppelman Member
Cheryl Probst Member
Pete Rife Member
Candace Rinke Member
Ashley Simeone Member
Nick Tarkany Member
Ron Tinnerman Member
Jon Werts Member
Laurie Westheimer Member
Bill Williams Member
Sue Zammit Member
Diane Arehart Member
Gary DeMarco Member
Emily Duke Member
Evelyn Griffin Member
Greg Griffin Member
Gary Hansen Member
Donna Huss Member
Jean Pummill Member
Jayne Weikel Member

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Nelly’s Taste of Bolivia in downtown Centerville.. Thank you to the owner of Nelly’s, Rafael Santillan and his fine team for the great food and the space.

We had 39 members and 11 guests in attendance.

Tonight’s Presentation

Jesse Gaither introduced tonight’s guest speaker, Bill DeFries. Bill recently published his book Impacts Beyond the Bounds – Explosive Success for Atypical People. Bill is a Marine Corp Veteran and has been a member of Centerville Noon Optimist club since November, 2004. He is also the CEO of Copp Integrated Systems, a member of the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame, serial entrepreneur, motivational speaker and author.

Bill started with some of his history. He was born on the South side of Chicago 58 years ago. He was a kid that didn’t like school and was in trouble a lot. He credits doing well to his parents staying together, high school sports and The U.S. Marine Corps.

In 1978, right after high school he had to get his own apartment. He obtained a job with the teamsters loading freight during the Jimmy Hoffa era. He quickly realized manual labor was not for him. He reconsidered college and was amazed he was accepted into Southern Illinois University. It didn’t take long for the university to reconsider and they kicked him out. He decided to enlist into the U.S. Marine Corp. That 4-year experience during the Cold War and the Beirut Embassy bombing crisis formed the basis for the rest of his life.

The book contains 10 simple things that helped him get where is here today, split into “Grenades” or chapters. His favorite is “Your Eighth Grenade: Give, Don’t Give Back.” Being a member of the Centerville Noon Optimist club truly helped him understand the concept of giving to the community. The picture on the cover of book is of him about to throw a live grenade.

He discussed his restaurants. He originally planned to open his first Beef O’Bradys in Chicago, but he fell in love with Dayton and Centerville. His first restaurant opened September 24, 2004. Soon after it was opened Judy DeMarco and Dave Kaye recruited him into the CNO.

He noted that life isn’t always a bowl of cherries. He recommends having friends around you for support. In 2007, he opened a second restaurant and right after in 2008 one of the worst economies in our history started. He thanks the Centerville and Beavercreek communities who helped sustain his restaurants when thousands of restaurants were closing every day during the recession.

He is glad to have been part of Dayton and provide employment. He is especially happy to have provided entry level jobs for youth at his restaurants.

Thank you, Bill DeFries, for sharing your story with us this evening.

CNOtes – February 19, 2019 – Alexis Larsen – Dayton Art Institute

Phather Phil’s Prayer

Heavenly Father where ever we are in our walk thru life, we owe a debt of gratitude to You and others. Gratitude is the soft thoughts from the heart that express our feelings of thanks for the good feeling they gave us. Gratitude comes in all sizes, from an act that saved a life to a genuine smile of a stranger as we passed. Gratitude is a great feeling for both the giver an receiver. Too many times we fail to give thanks for the little gifts of life. Like Woolworth said “little nickels and dimes add up.” When we have a good day, let us realize You most likely had a hand in it and give thanks. Amen!

Today’s Guests

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Dayton Art Institute Presentation

Bill Williams introduced Alexis Larsen, the External Affairs Director of The Dayton Art Institute.

The Dayton Art Institute (DAI) is celebrating the 100-year anniversary of the founding of the Dayton Art Institute. The “Gem on the Hill” was founded on February 28, 1919. The museum was opened to the public on January 10, 1930.

In 2019 DAI will celebrate by launching 100 events at the museum. There will be numerous improvements to the building and grounds with many changes for improved accessibility. The improvements are estimated to cost $9.7 million.

The building was a gift from Julia Shaw Patterson Carnell who was born in Dayton, OH on July 10, 1863 (check Dayton). She decided to donate $2 million as an endowment to the museum. Construction began for the current building in 1928 after 2 mansions that were donated were demolished. Unfortunately, the Great Depression occurred from 1929 – 1939 and the pledged donations dried up. Julia’s $2 million was transferred from the endowment to finish the building.

The current endowment is very underfunded for a museum of its size. Of the nearly $5 Million annual budget, 50% comes from contributions. The number one way to support the museum is to purchase a membership that is tax deductible. Two annual fund raisers, Octoberfest and the Art Ball, bring in $500,000 or one tenth of the annual budget. They are looking for more donations for additional improvements. The museum wants to add $15 million to their endowments.

Jerry Smith is the new curator and he is making numerous improvements to the collections.

The DAI collection is of the Encyclopedic museum type. The collection spans 5000 years. The Asian collection has been ranked as high as number 5 in the world.

2019 Special Exhibits Include:

  • For America: Paintings from the National Academy, on view February 23–June 2
  • Our Century: Dayton Area Collects, June 29–September 22
  • Maker & Muse: Women and Early 20th-Century Art Jewelry, October 25, 2019–January 19, 2020.

Julia was involved in the design of the building. Julia was impressed with Italian architecture during her travels so the new museum was modelled after that. She is quoted as saying to the designers, “No cloisters, then no building.” The gothic cloister was enclosed with the dome in the 1990’s. People travel to the DAI to study the Japanese Maple tree and the numerous columns located in the cloisters.

Alexis noted that the European collection includes a Monet. The Monet was generously donated by a successful businessman in New York. She is glad they asked him for it, because that is all it took to get it for DAI.

Quick Facts

  • The museum is very family friendly. Education resources include the Lange Family Experience Center.
  • In 1964 the Dayton Art Institute school expanded and closed after 1974-75 school year.
  • In 1997 DAI completed Julia’s vision of the expansion including modern art.
  • Julia Shaw Patterson Carnell is the cofounder of the Dayton Foundation.
  • In the great hall of the museum there is a portrait of Julia Shaw Patterson Carnell.

Links

Learn how you can support the museum here

http://www.daytonartinstitute.org/

http://www.daytonartinstitute.org/about-dai/history/building

Birthdays

Member Birthday
Patricia Kuhlman February 19
Julie Walling Noeth February 20
Stan Fronzaglia February 20
Mike Bevis February 21
John Thompson February 24

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Dave Gaines February 20 2/20/2013 6
Russell Hulbert February 20 2/20/2013 6
Bob Collins February 21 2/21/2014 5
Erin Belangia-Sanchez February 23 2/23/2006 13

New Member Readings and Inductions

Name Sponsor 1st 2nd 3rd Reading or Induction
Dan Apolito Scott Langer 3rd Reading
Jordan Feldkamp Guest at a  2.0 Meeting 2nd Reading
Tim Bemis Greg Fay 2nd Reading
Kyle Bergsman Barbara Santo 2nd Reading
Terri Leputa Julie Walling Noeth 2nd Reading

Sergeants at Arms

No time for Sergeants this week.

 Happy Bucks! 

No time for Happy Bucks this week.

CNOtes – February 12, 2019 – Boys and Girls Oratorical Contest

Phather Phil’s Prayer

Heavenly Father each piece of a quilt has its own color, pattern, texture and design. But when they are put together, they become a work of art. Just like the people in our Optimist club who have unique personalities, talents and skills. Our presence blesses one another in countless ways and helps touch the kids in a reflection of Your love. We pray that You will hold all the members in Your thoughts and continue to bless our work. The young people are a very important part of the fabric of our lives. Help us to continue to make it a tapestry of love. Amen!

Today’s Guests

Guest Guest Of
Tim Bemis Greg Fay
Kyle Bergsman Barbara Santo
Terri Leputa Julie Noeth
Dan Marciniak Cherie Gentry
Judy McFadden Donna Huss
Paul McNeil Mike Bevis
Jane Orr Donna Huss
Brooke Safley Blanca Ortiz
Shannon Simmons Kelly George

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Upcoming events

Beer and Wine Tasting Social

There will be a Wine and Beer tasting event on Saturday, February 23rd, 2019 at Diane and Patrick Arehart’s residence. You can taste wine, beer or both or just come to socialize.  Contact Diane Arehart (dla@arehart.com) or Beth Duncan (beth@lizardap.com) to sign up.

Upcoming Committee Meetings

Golf Committee will be meeting on Wednesday, February 20th, 2019 at 6:00 pm at Buckeye Home Care located on Paragon Road.

Childhood Cancer will be meeting on Thursday March 14th, 2019, at 6:30 at the Centerville Panera Bread.

Oratorical Contest was today (second and final week)

Liz Fultz, the chair of the Oratorical contest, introduced the participating students and described this annual event. This is the third year for Liz to chair this event. She would like to thank the content and timing judges for assisting with the event.

From Liz Fultz:

Today we have the second group of participants for the Margaret Barclay Memorial 2019 Optimist Oratorical Contest.  Since it was established in 1928, the Oratorical Contest has become the longest-running program sponsored by Optimists International.  This contest is named in honor of former Optimist member Margaret Barclay who passed away in 2010.   Margaret chaired this committee for many years.  She cared deeply about bringing out the best in kids and in living the Optimist Creed.  She was a most beloved member of our club, a past president and lived a life dedicated to helping others. Margaret Barclay’s accomplishments were vast including 40 years in public education, the last 27 in the Centerville Schools. She retired in 2000 as Principal at Magsig Middle School. It is a pleasure to see her memory continually being recognized in this way.

The Oratorical Contest is done in collaboration with Centerville Evening and South Metro Optimists, who also sponsor contests.  Mr. Roy Barclay, husband of Margaret, supports the contest by making an annual donation.  Thank you, Roy, for your ongoing contributions and support of this contest.

The rules were changed this year by Optimist International to make it co-ed instead of a boy group and a girl group.

https://centervillenoonoptimist.com/oratorical-contest/

Contestants deliver a four to five-minute speech.  One winner from each contest advances to the zone competition and then can advance to the finals at the district level.  Districts have the opportunity to provide a first-place scholarship of $2,500, a second-place scholarship of $1,500, and a third place scholarship of $1,000.

The 2019 topic “Is There a Fine Line Between Optimism and Reality?”.

To keep the judging fair, the names of the contestants were kept secret and we were not allowed to applaud the participants until all had presented. All of today’s students were from Centerville schools and were female.

Speaker A went first. She said that optimism and reality are not on opposite sides of the line but are interwoven. “Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence”, a quote from Helen Keller.

If you do the work in school, you will get that A, just being optimistic isn’t enough. Expectations in observing an event can change the perception of an event. Don’t be reckless with your optimism. If you don’t know how to ski, don’t start on the Diamond slope because reality still matters no matter how optimistic you are.

Speaker B was next. Imagine you have a hard head injury in a football game. The coach asks you what your name is and you don’t know it. You have been disconnected from reality. Optimists are fully aware of their reality. Optimists work hard to find nuggets of positivity in a difficult situation. Optimists value positivity and have created habits to stay happy. Sometimes an optimist blocks out the reality. A realist sees the worst in a situation. An optimist will look for ways to improve if they didn’t make it on a team, while a realist will complain about uncontrollable factors for why they didn’t make it.

Speaker C was next. Thomas Edison ignored the line between optimism and reality He ran his electric experiments more than 1000 times before succeeding with the electric light bulb. In the story of David vs Goliath, David’s optimism was important for giving him the strength to stand up against the Goliath with just a slingshot as a weapon.

She said she had practiced dance her entire life. She planned to be a primary dancer with the American Ballet Theater dance company. She had to quit dancing because of a disease she developed in her legs. Being an optimist, she started playing the violin again since she couldn’t dance anymore. She was very far behind the other students who had been in the symphony orchestra for several years already. She stayed optimistic and was able to catch up to the other musicians and play as well as the best players.

God has intertwined the line of optimism and reality, that weaves a beautiful tapestry of life. In conclusion she said abolish the line and make the impossible possible.

Speaker D was our final speaker. When life gives you lemons, make lemonade. Looking on the bright side of life can have a major impact on your life. Optimism can affect your life both physically and mentally. Optimists tend to live a longer, healthier life. Reality can be affected by optimism and make it better.

Being optimistic can change the reality of others around you. Use positivity to achieve goals. You are more likely to achieve goals when you are optimistic. When younger at a gymnastics competition, she was very nervous, but she was optimistic, and she overcame her nerves and took first place.

You must have a sense of reality while being optimistic. You still must try, learn and achieve to reach your goals. Firefighters in California are fighting numerous wild fires. They need both reality and optimism to put the fires out quickly and safely.

The relationship between optimism and reality require that you need to be realistic in your goals.

All four students did a fantastic job in both content and presentation. Only one moves forward and that is speaker D. You are welcome to go see her at the next round of the Oratorical contest at the library in a couple of weeks.

Birthdays

Member Birthday
Dan Samiec February 12
John Horner February 12
Monty Zinck February 13
Ken Peacock February 16

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Brent Richburg February 13 2/13/2018 1
Brian Nolan February 13 2/13/2018 1
Clint Freese February 13 2/13/2018 1
Jon Werts February 13 2/13/2018 1
June Bosworth February 13 2/13/2018 1
Laurie Westheimer February 13 2/13/2018 1
Mike Schwartz February 13 2/13/2018 1
Suzanne Werts February 13 2/13/2018 1
Bob Lawson February 17 2/17/2016 3
Harry Bossey February 17 2/17/1994 25
John Horner February 17 2/17/2010 9
Lou Brinkman February 17 2/17/1995 24
Sandy Stevens February 17 2/17/2010 9
Sarah Umbreit February 17 2/17/2016 3
Jack Anderson February 18 2/18/2016 3
Laura Caschera February 18 2/18/1997 22

New Member Readings and Inductions

Name Sponsor 1st 2nd 3rd Reading or Induction
Katie Calloway Gary Hansen 3rd Reading
Cheryl Dowd Joan Cordonnier 3rd Reading
Ashley Simeone Emily Duke 3rd Reading
Ron Thompson Jean Pummill 3rd Reading
Dan Apolito Scott Langer 2nd Reading
Jordan Feldkamp Guest at a  2.0 Meeting 1st Reading
Tim Bemis Greg Fay 1st Reading
Kyle Bergsman Guest at a  2.0 Meeting 1st Reading
Terri Leputa Julie Walling Noeth 1st Reading

Sergeants at Arms

Member Infraction
Any female member Being female
Any male member Being male
Morgan Schiffhauer When buying a 50/50 ticket said she had plenty of money
Melissa Deeter 50/50 bought with change
Jerry Stahley Banners were hung straight but a bit wrinkled

 Happy Bucks! 

No happy bucks this week.

CNOtes – February 5, 2019 – Boys and Girls Oratorical Contest

Phather Phil’s Prayer

Heavenly Father each piece of a quilt has its own color, pattern,
texture and design. But when they are put together, they become a
work of art. Just like the people in our Optimist club who have unique
personalities, talents and skills. Our presence blesses one another in
countless ways and helps touch the kids in a reflection of Your love.
We pray that You will hold all the members in Your thoughts and
continue to bless our work. The young people are a very important
part of the fabric of our lives. Help us to continue to make it a
tapestry of love.  Amen!

Today’s Guests

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Flippin’ Awesome Awards Presentation

Donna Huss presented “Flippin’ Awesome” awards to Evelyn Griffin and Tom Novak for their support of the January 17th 2019 NOW event. Evelyn produced a mailing from every individual that had a tree delivered during our tree lot sale. Tom completed a mailing to all of the current AOF (Avenue of Flags) subscribers. Both of these individuals went “Above and Beyond” to assist in making the NOW event the success it was. Thank you, again, to both of you!!

NOW is an acronym for “New Optimists Welcome”. Read more about it here. We will be having more NOW events this year.

Committee Announcements

Golf Committee: Next committee meeting will be Wednesday, February 20th, 2019 at 6:00 pm at Buckeye Home Care located on Paragon Road.

PGI/PDP:  Myron will again be available before and after next week’s lunch meeting to sign-up or update member passports. Please make an effort to see Myron.

Childhood Cancer: Next committee meeting will be Thursday, February 7th, 2019 at the Centerville Panera at 6:30pm. Their next meeting is March 14th, 2019 (same time and location).

Social Committee: there will be a Wine and Beer tasting event on Saturday, February 23rd, 2019 at Diane and Patrick Arehart’s residence. You can try both wine and beer, or just one (or neither, there will be lots of food). More details will follow.

Oratorical Contest was today.

Liz Fultz, the chair of the Oratorical contest, introduced the participating students and described this annual event. This is the third year for Liz to chair this event. She would like to thank the content and timing judges for assisting with the event.

From Liz Fultz:

February 5th 2019 is the first day of the Margaret Barclay Memorial 2019 Optimist Oratorical Contest.  Since it was established in 1928, the Oratorical Contest has become the longest-running program sponsored by Optimists International.  This contest is named in honor of former Optimist member Margaret Barclay who passed away in 2010.   Margaret chaired this committee for many years.  She cared deeply about bringing out the best in kids and in living the Optimist Creed.  She was a most beloved member of our club, a past president and lived a life dedicated to helping others. Margaret Barclay’s accomplishments were vast including 40 years in public education, the last 27 in the Centerville Schools. She retired in 2000 as Principal at Magsig Middle School. It is a pleasure to see her memory continually being recognized in this way.

The Oratorical Contest is done in collaboration with Centerville Evening and South Metro Optimists, who also sponsor contests.  Mr. Roy Barclay, husband of Margaret, supports the contest by making an annual donation.  Thank you, Roy, for your ongoing contributions and support of this contest.

https://centervillenoonoptimist.com/oratorical-contest/

Contestants deliver a four to five minute speech.  One winner from each contest advances to the zone competition and then can advance to the finals at the district level.  Districts have the opportunity to provide a first place scholarship of $2,500, a second place scholarship of $1,500, and a third place scholarship of $1,000.

The 2019 topic “Is There a Fine Line Between Optimism and Reality?”.

To keep the judging fair, the names of the contestants were kept secret and we were not allowed to applaud the participants until all had presented.

This contest will be held at our lunch this week and next. This week all four students are from Incarnation School. Next week there will be 3 from Centerville middle schools and another from Incarnation School.

Today, the first three participants were female and the final a male.

Speaker A went first. She argued that there is a fine line between optimism and reality. She reflected on fictional characters to demonstrate this line. The daily news has been very negative and she has had many deaths in her family recently. Keeping optimistic helps to get through life’s challenges. “Through the darkness is how we find the light.”

Speaker B was next. Thomas Jefferson said, “Nothing can stop a positive man from doing anything he wants to do.” Navy Seals use active optimism. She said the optimist in her is helping her recover from a recent concussion. The Navy Seals are not successful from luck, but from preparation and a positive optimism. Ghandi, Jefferson and Ben Carson all used a positive mental attitude to reach their goals.

Speaker C was next. She quoted Mary Lou Retton, “Optimism is a happiness magnet. If you stay positive, good things and good people will be drawn to you.” Being optimistic is a magnet for success. The fine line lies between the meaning of the two terms optimism and reality. The appearance of reality is affected by whether you choose an optimistic or pessimistic outlook. Hope and optimism improves reality. She shared a story of how her sports team stayed optimistic on a very hot day to come back and win a match.

Speaker D was our final speaker. Steve Jobs quoted, “You cannot connect the dots moving forward, only by looking back.” Optimism allows you to work on the future dots with the plan that they will connect. Optimists expect good from reality and live a life being positive. You want your reality to be the best it can be. Optimism is a mindset to make tasks in life easier. There is a fine line and hopefully your dots will be connected in a positive way.

All four students did a fantastic job in both content and presentation. Only one moves forward and that is speaker C. You are welcome to go see her at the next round of the Oratorical contest at the library in a couple of weeks.

Birthdays

Member Birthday
Greg Crabtree February 05
Shelby DiPasquale February 06
Don Kelley February 08
Mariah Vogelgesang February 08
Ron Tinnerman February 11

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Renee Glenn February 5 2/5/2014 5
Ellie Parker February 8 2/8/2011 8
Patricia Kuhlman February 8 2/8/2011 8

New Member Readings and Inductions

Due to the time needed for Boys and Girls Oratorical Contests, we did not do any new reading nor inductions this week.

Sergeants at Arms

No time for sergeants this week.

 Happy Bucks! 

No time for Happy Bucks this week.

CNOtes – January 29, 2019 – Jim Finke – CEO, Crystal Spirits

Phather Phil’s Prayer

Heavenly Father your son ‘s birth was the beginning of 30 odd years
of instructions for us to live by. In faith we try to live our lives
accordingly. But You also gave us a free will which in turn allows us
to put our own spin on Your teachings. Sometimes our spin puts us in
troubled waters. Thankfully You made yourself our bridge to get us
out of our troubled waters. A bridge we probably use too often. So
help us Lord to stay on the path You have set for us and not use You
as our get out of jail free card.  Amen!

Today’s Guests

Guest Guest Of
Dan Apolito Scott Langer
Charlie Ballinger Dick Stevens
Michelle Brown Mike Bevis
Jim Finke Speaker
Mike Fullenkamp Scott Langer
Julie Langer Scott Langer
Doug Reno Carolyn Taylor
Cindy Sitzman Wendy Hatton
Kerrie Smith Joe Kronenburger
Steve Smith AKA “The Flower Man” Scott Langer
Ron Thompson Jean Pummill

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Happy Birthday to Scott Langer

Today was Scott Langer’s Birthday. Bob Duffy led our infamous group of singers. It was an awful sound as always, but it still makes everyone smile. Happy Birthday to Scott Langer!

Today’s Speaker

Dick Stevens introduced Jim Finke, CEO, and Charlie Ballinger, Regional Sales Manager, from Crystal Spirits, a small distiller of Handcrafted Buckeye Vodka.

Jim Fink spoke to us. He said, “Thanks for having him here today.” He asked, “How many have heard of Buckeye Vodka? How many have tried it? How many of you have made it your brand of choice?” Very few answered yes to the last question, so he said, “I need to work harder to increase that number.”

He discussed how the idea of making vodka came about. He was running the 4th generation of a family business called the “Finke Co” which was started in 1886 and has been in Dayton for over 130 years. It was a wholesale non-foods distributor. This business had gotten much smaller and in 2008, they needed to do something else. This was not a good time in the economy. No one was starting a new business. The housing market burst and in December, 2008, GM closed the Moraine assembly plant. In June of 2009, NCR moved 1400 jobs to Georgia. Every family member, friend, neighbor and business owner he knew suffered from the poor economy and those losses.

He and his younger brother in Texas searched for months to find something to buy. The only businesses available were already distressed.

His brother called one day and asked, “What about if we started making vodka?” Alcohol sales is one business that does well in a down economy. They studied the industry and learned that 33% of liquor sales are Vodka. Craft distillers have expanded greatly. Sales of gallon size vodka had increased. People were willing to sacrifice quality for more quantity at the same price. Small craft distillers were a small but growing group. In 2000 there were 12; by 2010 there were 400; today there are 1600 and growing.

They asked themselves if they could make an ultra-premium vodka and sell it under market value.

It all seemed to come together. They would leverage Jim’s experience in distribution and retail merchandising. Additionally, his brother-in-law, Tom Rambasek, owned the Crystal Water Co and it was also hurting because of the economy. They could use this high-quality, distilled water in making their vodka. Plus, Tom had space that could be converted into a distillery.

To keep costs down they developed the company to operate debt free. It is a family business and all 5 of his siblings have shares in the company.

It is very complicated to make and sell spirits in Ohio. They had to hire a lobbyist to help with the state compliance. Ohio controls every aspect of the liquor business. He noted that retail store owners only earn 5% on the sale of liquor. In February, 2010 they met with state liquor control board. The state controls and can also guarantee distribution. They gave them 210 stores which is half of all the stores in the state.

For a great product you want a great name and a great package. The name Buckeye Vodka came up in the first conversation about the name. There was concern that brand name may not sell very well in Michigan.

The wanted their product to be pure, smooth, handcrafted, using the best ingredients. It is to be made with the best water and grains using efficient technology and create a superior quality product. The distilled water is tested to 10 micro ohms which means it is nearly perfectly pure.

Once they decided on a designer and name in April 2010, they found out that Ohio State University wanted to prevent them from using the brand name which cost them 9 months. This eventually worked out. It took 9 months to settle on the bottle design. During this process the governor of Ohio changed which can disrupt the process because all new people come in on the liquor board.

They were finally granted a federal license in February, 2011.

Quick Facts

  • Their product is distilled 10 times. Depending on how you examine the process, it is technically closer to 30 distillations
  • Each batch is 430 gallons.
  • It takes about 1 week from start to finish to make a batch.
  • The filtering is what is the major influencer of the taste, not the number of distillations.
  • The first year they sold 3500 cases which was a huge success. The state of Ohio almost gave them no distribution because they thought the product wouldn’t sell.
  • In 2012 they sold 5700 cases.
  • In 2016 they sold 10,000 cases.
  • They now sell in Kentucky and West Virginia, and most recently to Illinois. Their plan is to be in 10-15 states in the next few years.
  • In 2012 there were named the Ohio Distillery of the year.
  • In 2014 they were permitted to make 1.75-liter bottles.
  • Their product is gluten free and this is stated on the bottle. Unlike many other brands their vodka is made from corn from Ohio and the Midwest, which grows the best corn in the world.
  • They now have 3 sales reps.

They have just hired Greg Sabatino from Sabatino West advertising agency to do broadcasting and heighten awareness of the brand.

Locally they get some help. They received a lot of publicity from local media such as channel 45 and the Dayton Business Journal.

He said, “We’re looking forward to seeing what the increased awareness will do for sales.”

Birthdays

Member Birthday
Clint Freese January 29
Scott Langer January 29
Karen Sirmans January 31
David Ladd February 01
Donna Huss February 01
Mike Schwartz February 3

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Todd Kelchner January 30 1/30/1992 27
Mike Bevis January 31 1/31/2002 17
Rachel Goetz January 31 1/31/2013 6

New Member Readings and Inductions

Name Sponsor 1st 2nd 3rd Reading or Induction
Doug Reno Carolyn Taylor 3rd Reading
Katie Calloway Gary Hansen 2nd Reading
Cheryl Dowd Joan Cordonnier 2nd Reading
Ashley Simeone Emily Duke 2nd Reading
Ron Thompson Jean Pummill 2nd Reading
Dan Apolito Scott Langer 1st Reading

Sergeants at Arms

No time for sergeants this week.

 Happy Bucks! 

No time for Happy Bucks this week.

CNOtes – January 22, 2019 – Jim McCutcheon – “The Guitar Man”

Today’s Guests

Guest Guest Of
Jack Grady Mike Bevis
Sherry Marchal Grey Fay
Jim McCutcheon Speaker
Ron Thompson Jean Pumill

All Photos from the Meeting are Here

Substitute MC today

Donna Huss is on vacation. President-elect Greg Griffin was the master of ceremonies for today’s lunch.

Committee Announcements

Greg Griffin discussed the NOW event from last Thursday 1/17/2019. We gained 5 new members. Also, new members found out more about our club. Thank you to everyone who helped at the NOW event.

Beth Duncan, social committee, announced that there is a Dinner/Euchre party on Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 6PM at Bennett’s Publical Family Sports Grill in Miamisburg. Cost is only $5/person.

Greg Fay announced that Ron Tinnerman has arranged for Janelle Ross to be a speaker soon for Optimist 2.0.

Greg Fay announced the next several CNO 2.0 events. All are from 5:30 PM to approximately 7 PM.

  • 2/21/2019 Bill Defries, CEO of Copp Integrated Systems, at Nelly’s Taste of Boliva
  • 3/21/2019 John Highley, Owner of Dent Magic John, at Heavier Than Air Brewing
  • 4/18/2019 Cindy Gaboury, Owner of Audio Etc., at OIllie’s Place

Today’s Speaker and Concert

Dick Stevens introduced Jim McCutcheon, who is known as the “Guitar Man”. He owns McCutcheon Music in Centerville on Marco Lane. He started playing the guitar and other instruments when he was 10 years old and he loves them.

Jim shared some of his story and played the guitar for us. He started with a joke. He said, “Hello, I have been Jim McCutcheon for 67 years.”

In his youth he took lessons for 4 years. He went UD to study physics. It was there that he found a private tutor for guitar. The tutor said, “You only have 2 problems. Your left hand and your right hand.” Jim got to study under him for a short time each year for 4 years. He was thankful to find this teacher. He had not improved his playing for several years and this teacher helped him figure out how to get to the next level of playing.

The first song he played for us was “The Entertainer” by Scott Joplin. It was amazing! It sounded like his guitar came alive.

He completed his bachelor’s degree in physics and was accepted into medical school. By now, though, he wasn’t sure if he liked the idea of becoming a doctor more than becoming a musician. His advisor at medical school said, “I’ll give you 2 years to decide what you want to do when you grow up.”

Jim, after college, was playing or practicing music for 65 hours a week. He said, “I lived a life of music. I had more energy at the end of week than he had at the beginning of the week. I truly loved music.”

He was part of a band that was similar in style of the Juthro Tull rock band and they went on tour. Jim played guitar and flute.

He decided to go with music over med school. He became the first graduate with a degree in classical guitar from Wright State University and it was also the first degree of this type in Montgomery County. After graduation, he got a job at Sinclair teaching classical guitar. Eventually, he also received jobs at Wright State and Antioch.

The second song was number one in 1968, which was surprising at the time because there were no lyrics. The song he played was “Classical Gas” by Mason Williams. He got to meet Mason in 1969. Jim really loved how much Mason could do with a guitar. This was also amazing to listen to.

Later, Jim started teaching lessons in his home. His wife was not thrilled with all the students coming into their home. Jim then rented space across from where City Barbecue is. After a few years, he outgrew that space and moved to where he is now on Marco Lane in Centerville.

McCutcheon Music now has 50 teachers and teaches 500 students a week. He has a great staff of 18 people. He keeps expanding into more available space in the building he occupies. He loves the path that his career has taken. When he was younger, he never thought he would own over 500 violins that would be rented out to students.

The last song he played was a famous Spanish song called “Malaguena” by Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona. It was mesmerizing.

Thank you “Guitar Man” for entertaining us today!

Birthdays

Member Birthday
Todd Kelchner January 24
Martha Jackson January 25
Dan Passidomo January 26
Gary Hansen January 28

Membership Anniversaries

Member Month Day Joined # Years
Jeff Kujawa January 22 1/22/2015 4
Mike Yoder January 22 1/22/2014 5
John Thompson January 23 1/23/2018 1
Greg Wasmund January 25 1/25/2007 12
Chris McAlpine January 27 1/27/2009 10

New Member Readings and Inductions

Name Sponsor 1st 2nd 3rd Reading or Induction
Doug Reno Carolyn Taylor 2nd Reading
Katie Calloway Gary Hansen 1st Reading
Cheryl Dowd Joan Cordonnier 1st Reading
Ashley Simeone Emily Duke 1st Reading
Ron Thompson Jean Pummill 1st Reading

Sergeants at Arms

Member Infraction
Anyone who lives where you don’t have to shovel snow. in a condo or aparment For not having to shovel snow
Jane Fiehrer Late to meeting
Charlie Tapp Being the “best” dressed today (he was pretty casual)
Carrie Million Being very specific to the sergeants about which three 50/50 tickets she wants. She wanted one from the beginning, middle, and the end of the row.
Casey Wyckoff Late to meeting
Gary Smiga Picture in the paper without wearing Optimist pin
Diane Arehart Didn’t return badge last week
Greg Griffin Lost the bell and gavel

 Happy Bucks! 

Member Reason
Dan Beck Expecting grandbaby twins later this year, a boy and girl.
Art Hung Son cam home last Wednesday from Children’s. Thank you for all the love, cards and notes you sent.
Paul Stull It has been nearly 50 years since he joined CNO and he feels like a kid.
Julie Noeth Having a tractor with a plow so she didn’t have to shovel snow over the weekend.