CNO 2.0 Meeting Recap 11/18/21: Shoes 4 the Shoeless, Kris Horlacher

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Loose Ends Brewing, 890 S Main St, Centerville, OH. Thank you to the team at Loose Ends Brewing for the great beer, food and space.

There were 26 attendees at the meeting (21 members and 5 guests).

Jesse Gaither, CNO 2.0 Committee, said he was so thankful for all the guests and members that came to tonight’s meeting.

Shoes for the Shoeless, Kris Horlacher

Jesse Gaither introduced Kris Horlacher, the Founder and Executive Director of Shoes 4 the Shoeless (S4TS) that she founded in 2010. Over 125,000 children have been served. They are a mobile shoe store with 2 trucks. In 2016, S4TS received the BBB Eclipse Integrity Award. Prior to starting S4TS, Kris was a nurse.

Kris has 12 siblings and grew up learning what poor is. She said that poverty is not the same as it was decades ago. What people go without now is much worse.

You can view Kris’s slide deck here.

CNO gave Kris the 2021 Community Champion Award. You can read more about S4TS in the article about that award here.

About Shoeless for the Shoeless

Their mission is, “To provide new, properly fitting gym shoes and socks to local children in need.”

Their vision is, “Relentlessly pursue our mission so that no child endures the unnecessary physical and emotional distress that results from wearing socks/shoes that are grossly inadequate. We will strive to become a valued organization in our community, known for our devoted and caring volunteers along with our faith-in-action.”

Each month, 500+ volunteers help to make shoe deliveries possible. Some school districts send high school students to serve as volunteers.

Properly fitting shoes and socks is the biggest unmet need for a child in poverty. Deformed toes do not correct themselves unless corrected before high school.

S4TS provides shoes and socks to children in desperate need. Many have worn shoes that were ill-fitting for a long period of time. Growth deformities occur due to shoes being too tight, too large, or falling apart.

For many of the children they help, S4TS provides the first pair of shoes that was purchased specifically for them.

Socks are also a huge need for the children served. They see many socks that are falling part or children who are not even wearing socks with their shoes.

Dayton Tornadoes

After the Dayton tornadoes, there was not much for some children to be joyful about. S4TS went out in the midst of the rubble and provided hope. She started working in the early morning hours the day after 21 tornadoes hit the Dayton area on Memorial Day 2019, because she knew a lot of help would be needed.

Children’s Hospital Partnerships

Shoes 4 the Shoeless partners with both Dayton Children’s and Cincinnati Children’s Hospitals.

Dayton Children’s Hospital asked S4TS if there is a way to help get shoes for their needy patients. The solution S4TS created was to have a fully stocked shoe closet at both Children’s Hospitals. There are now 12 shoe closets in the community. Some patients are in the hospital so long that their feet grow enough that their shoes no longer fit. This is a huge expense for many families who are already struggling with their child’s treatments.

S4TS Stories About Schools They Have Helped

Kris said they continue to see the absolute BEST of America and Americans. They have seriously met some of the most incredible people in our country.

  • A school S4TS did shoe delivery at collected goods for them to take on a relief trip to North Carolina after it was decimated by a hurricane. The school had a thank you parade of students for the S4TS volunteers. The NC Kids of impoverished families put several boxes of supplies that were needed in Texas when it was decimated by a hurricane.
  • A local principal rallied her school building to collect backpacks for S4TS to take to Texas after a hurricane ripped through the greater Houston area. They even filled the backpacks with supplies for the school-age children in that part of the country.
  • A principal in Texas and her staff saved many school supplies from flood waters. The S4TS team was able to come down and help provide additional supplies and manpower to help get their building operational again. Only one school stayed dry because it was high enough on a hill. They were stacking laptops on top of each other to try and keep them dry. During this Kris and her team were sleeping in a church with no running water. Kris and her team were invited back to the principal’s home to sleep and he then wrote a $10,000 personal check to S4TS.

Food 4 the People Project

At the height of the COVID pandemic, we pivoted and created the Food 4 the People project. A week before the COVID shutdown occurred, she knew people were going to starve. Food banks and St Vincent de Paul called her to ask if S4TS could help.

People, organizations, and companies gathered food. The food was collected at church partners and organized for distribution.

Volunteers stepped up to drive and hand-deliver bags of food to people in need around our community. CHS football players helped load vehicles and then asked to help deliver.

From March 2020 to June 2020 they delivered 110,000 meals helping 3000 families. Check out this video, Food 4 the People Donates 6,800 boxes of Food.

Thank You Kris Horlacher

Thank you, Kris Horlacher and your organization. We have all been enlightened to the issue of shoes for the youth in need in our communities.

Club Announcements

  • Christy Gariety, Adopt-a-Family co-chair, announced that she and Sue Jessee are accepting $50 gift cards at CNO lunches and on Christmas Tree Delivery Day (Nov 20) with activation code receipts from Kohl’s, Target, or Walmart to be given to families this holiday season. The cards need to be received by 11/29/2021. You may also mail the gift cards with the activation receipts and a note stating, “From Centerville Noon Optimist Member”, to Centerville Schools, Adopt A Family Program, 111 Virginia Ave, Centerville OH 45458. Email her if you send a donation.
  • Gary Hansen announced that the TOP Optimist Club is selling Poinsettias for $15 as a fundraiser. Delivery will be December 7, 2021 at the noon lunch meeting.
  • Greg Griffin announced the tree lot will be open 11/26/2021. The shifts all end by 8 PM each evening. Please show up for your assigned shifts to help with one of your club’s major fundraisers.

About CNO 2.0

CNO 2.0 is a club within a club of the Centerville Noon Optimist club. CNO (and CNO 2.0) is a world class service organization. Being a member of either club allows their members all the same opportunities to participate in fundraising and club activities. CNO 2.0 was created about 5 years ago and is very much a part of the 53-year-old Centerville Noon Optimist Club. CNO has given away over $2 million during its history. CNO is a group of like-minded members that are passionate about helping youth and having fun in the process.

The speaker at each 2.0 meeting is someone with a local business success story.

Annual Fundraisers

  • Christmas Tree Lot
  • Avenue of Flags
  • Golf Outing

Major Activities for the youth in our community

  • Build-a-Bear at Children’s Hospital, 3 times a year
  • Fishing Derby in June
  • Kid’s Day in the Park in August
  • Easter Egg Hunt

CNO 2.0 Meeting Recap 10/21/21: Flyin’ to the Hoop, Eric Horstman

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Bock Family Brewing, located at 8150 Washington Village Dr, Centerville, OH 45458. Thank you to the team at Bock’s for the space and service.

There were 30 people at the meeting (26 members and 4 guests).

New Member Induction

Greg Griffin inducted new member McKenzie Morin as the newest member of CNO 2.0. McKenzie’s sponsor is Bill Stone. McKenzie was the founding president of the original University of Dayton Optimist Club 16 years ago. Currently, McKenzie is the Senior Associate Director for Alumni Constituent Programs at UD and is the co-advisor this year for the new UD Optimist Club with Kelly Stone.

Flyin’ to the Hoop, Eric Horstman

Greg Fay introduced Eric Horstman, the founder and president of Flyin’ to the Hoop. The Flyin’ to the Hoop Invitational is an annual tournament of 34 high school teams playing 19 games at the James S. Trent Arena in Kettering, Ohio. Outstanding teams with future NBA stars are invited from all over the U.S. The tournament runs for 4 days each year. The 19th annual event will be January 14-17, 2022. As of June 2021, 87 participants in Flyin’ to the Hoop have played for the NBA. This year, 10 of the 34 teams playing are from the Dayton area. The economic impact for the Dayton area is $1.9 Million each year.

Eric was raised in Troy and currently resides in Springboro. He earned his Master’s in Environmental Engineering. He was making good money at the Mound Laboratory, but 25 years ago he switched to Sports Marketing. The tournament got started because Dayton area basketball coaches challenged Eric to start an invitational basketball tournament.

Flyin’ to the Hoop is the second biggest high school tournament in the world. The only one ahead of it is the Hoophall Classic in Springfield, Massachusetts near the NBA Hall of Fame where there are a lot more people. Both annual tournaments are held over Martin Luther King Jr. weekend. The two tournaments cooperate each year so that some of the teams can compete in both tournaments.

Tickets are only $20/day. You can see 2 games on Friday, 6 games on Saturday or Sunday, and 5 on Monday.

The high school coaches that have gone to both tournaments always say that the accommodations and ease of access is much better in Dayton. Flyin’ to the Hoop’s venue at Kettering’s Trent Arena holds twice as many people as the Blake Arena where the Hoophall Classic is held.

There have been international teams from Canada invited and one from Finland. The international teams are very excited for the chance to be seen by American college recruiters.

Flyin’ to the Hoop pays all the expenses for the teams and coaches. This includes flights, lodging and food. They did, however, tell Finland they would need to cover their flights.

Each year, 150 teams contact the organization to try and get an invitation to the tournament. Each year there are about 5, 5-star players and 40, 4-star players among the teams. The only team that gets to be in the tournament every year is Kettering, since it is the home team. Some teams think they should be invited every year, but the organization spreads invitations around.

Each year there are several kids that get offered scholarships to college based solely on their performance in a game in this tournament. Eric said that the exposure works.

Many ask why the University of Dayton or Wright State University with their larger stadiums have not been chosen to host the event. Eric is very happy with Trent Arena, but even if he wasn’t there are NCAA rules that don’t allow private high school tournaments to be hosted by colleges as this might create an unfair recruitment advantage for the college.

Thank You Eric Horstman

Thank you, Eric Horstman, for telling us about the annual Flyin’ to the Hoop basketball tournament.

Announcements

  • Greg Griffin announced that 840 Christmas trees will be delivered on 11/20/2021 at 8 AM. We need as many members as possible to help unload the trees, drill a hole in the bottom and stack them in the correct bins. Numerous hot soups will be served afterwards. No need to sign up, just show up! Come and be a part of one your club’s biggest fundraisers that help us serve area youth.
  • Denise O’Neil announced that the Haunted Trail was a tremendous success. Thanks to all the volunteers. Special thanks to Mike Cordonnier and the high school students who were a tremendous help in building the sets, delivering them and then tearing them down. Thank you to the corporate sponsors Dorothy Lane Market, Sam’s Club, Bills Donuts and Coldwell Banker. Thanks to the Montgomery County Sheriff’s department for helping with the crowds. The lines had to be shut down early since there was so much interest in the event. We collected 10 Barrels of food donations. Thank you to the RecPlex staff for being very helpful with the event, including helping move the food barrels with their forklift.
  • Christy Gariety, Adopt-a-Family co-chair, announced that she and Sue Jessee are accepting $50 gift cards at CNO lunches and on Christmas Tree Delivery Day (Nov 20) with activation code receipts from Kohl’s, Target, or Walmart to be given to families this holiday season. The cards need to be received by 11/29/2021. You may also mail those gift cards with the activation receipts and a note stating, “From Centerville Noon Optimist Member”, to Centerville Schools, Adopt A Family Program, 111 Virginia Ave, Centerville OH 45458. Email her if you send a donation.
  • Mike Bevis announced that there will be drive through Trick or Treat at the covered entrance of the Franciscan restaurant at St Leonard, from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM a drive through. Feel free to drive through, they will have lots of candy!

About CNO 2.0

Greg Fay, the chair of CNO 2.0, said he was so thankful for all the guests and members that came to tonight’s meeting.

Greg Fay said that CNO 2.0 is a club within a club of the Centerville Noon Optimist club. CNO (and CNO 2.0) is a world class service organization. Being a member of either club allows their members all the same opportunities to participate in fundraising and club activities. CNO 2.0 was created about 4 years ago and is very much a part of the 53-year-old Centerville Noon Optimist Club. CNO has given away over $2 million during its history. CNO is a group of like-minded members that are passionate about helping youth and having fun in the process.

The speaker at each 2.0 meeting is someone with a local business success story.

Annual Fundraisers

  • Christmas Tree Lot
  • Avenue of Flags
  • Golf Outing

Major Activities for the youth in our community

  • Build-a-Bear at Children’s Hospital, 3 times a year
  • Fishing Derby in June
  • Kid’s day in the park in August
  • Easter Egg Hunt

CNO 2.0 Meeting Recap 9/16/21: The story of professional DJ, DJ Dors E

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Tuscany’s Italian Restaurant located at 881 E. Franklin St, Centerville, OH. Thank you to the owners and their fine team for the great food and the space to have our meeting.

Announcements

  • Denise O’Neil announced that the Haunted Trail Committee needs several volunteers to work as guides for the Haunted Trail community event. She also needs old white sheets and old dolls.
  • Debe Dockins announced that the tree lot will be open on November 26, 2021. Greg Griffin is looking for 3 volunteers to replace 3 tree lot captains stepping down this year.
  • Debe Dockins announced that the next CNO 2.0 meeting will be 10/21/2021 at 5:30 PM at Bock Family Brewing. The speaker will be Eric Horstman, founder and president of Flying to the Hoop.

Social Event

  • 10/10/2021 at 2 PM there will be a group Corn Maze outing. Valuable prizes will be awarded for the team that finishes the maze puzzle first. Afterwards the group will go to dinner together at Bennet’s Publical Family Sports Grill in Miamisburg.

Community Events                                

  • 10/12/2021 and 10/13/2021, the Haunted Trail event will be held at Countryside Park behind the RecPlex.
  • 10/8/2021, 6 PM, Tri-Star Soccer will be held at the High School Soccer field which is between Magsig and Cline.

DJ Terrance Dorsey

Greg Fay introduced Terrance Dorsey, a professional DJ who is known as DJ Dors E and is the self-proclaimed #PartyInstigator. He has been a DJ/Entertainer since November 2009. Additionally, Terrance is an entrepreneur in real estate investing. During the day Terrance is a senior analyst at PNC Bank. Terrance is also the CEO of Great Harvest Publishing LLC which offers Project management for clean/Christian entertainment and DJ services for clean entertainment. He and his wife have two children who attend Centerville Schools.

DJ Dors E’s name is an acronym for Doing our Redeemer Service Excellent.

Terrance worked at a prison ministry and it was there that someone told him if you put out the chairs they will come. He said for his DJ business (especially the first 5 years) he put out a lot of chairs and now the customers have come. He is still putting out the chairs.

You can find him on Facebook.

You can sample DJ Dors E work on Mixcloud.com.

Real Estate Investing

Terrance is a real estate investor. He has owned several investment properties and he is building up his wealth using his gains. In 2015 Terrance and his family moved from Trotwood to Centerville. Real estate during COVID has been very good for his investments including the house he purchased in 2015 that he has since sold. Recently, his family moved into a new house that they built in Centerville.

Terrance is continually learning and improving his investing and entertainment skills.

Terrance tried going to school at Sinclair, but it did not work out and he is very happy to not be strapped with student debt. He said that his generation has been told to go to school, get a great job and retire, but that is not how it works anymore. Terrance is building something that will last for generations, which is something he was never taught.

How he became a DJ

Terrance said he became a DJ by accident. In 2009 at the age of 28, Terrance had his first gig. Initially he did weddings and after 5 years of smaller gigs, he had an opportunity to work at a party for a large church and the person in charge did not accept his first invoice and told him he needed to charge a lot more. This party exposed his services to a lot more people and eventually it led to opportunities with corporate clients. His customers are willing to pay his rates because he works hard at giving his clients’ guests a great time. He does not overcharge. He has learned what a reasonable charge is for the service he is providing.

DJ Dors E clients have included PNC Bank, Wright Patt Credit Union, Real Estate Firms, Care Source and various large churches. He creates play lists monthly for several gyms, who use them for hour long workouts at the gym.

Terrance is close to making enough off being a DJ to not have a day job. He likes his job at PNC and when COVID hit, his entertainment opportunities were lower for a while.

Terrance has been a musical group manager and he liked it except for the travel required that took him away from his family.

A DJs Job

Great DJs do not allow their audience to change what is played with random requests. When you hire a DJ it is their job to get a party going within a few minutes. Playlists must be crafted in a way to keep the flow going. Some songs just cannot be played back-to-back or the whole vibe will come down. DJ Dors E gets his audiences to get up and dance!

Remember that DJ Dors E is the #PartyInstigator!

Thank You Terrance Dorsey

Thank you, DJ Dors E, for speaking at tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting and telling the story of your entertainment career, your real estate career and your day job!

About CNO 2.0

Greg Fay, the chair of CNO 2.0, said he was so thankful for all the guests and members that came to tonight’s meeting.

Greg Fay said that CNO 2.0 is a club within a club of the Centerville Noon Optimist club. CNO (and CNO 2.0) is a world class service organization. Being a member of either club allows their members all the same opportunities to participate in fundraising and club activities.

Annual Fundraisers

  • Christmas Tree Lot
  • Avenue of Flags
  • Golf Outing

Major Activities for the youth in our community

  • Build-a-Bear at Children’s Hospital, 3 times a year
  • Fishing Derby in June
  • Kid’s day in the park in August
  • Easter Egg Hunt

CNO 2.0 Meeting Recap 8/19/21: Freedom Whiskey Co., Zach Hollingsworth, the founder of Freedom Whiskey Co

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Nelly’s Taste of Bolivia at 79 S. Main St Centerville, Ohio. Thank you to the owner of Nelly’s, Rafael Santillan, and his fine team for the great food and the space.

There was a 50/50 drawing won by Brian Nicholas.

There were 24 people at the meeting (20 members and 4 guests).

Avenue of Flags Needs Your Help

Tom Novak, the chair of Avenue of Flags, told the group about one of our major fundraisers. Flags are delivered for Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day, Labor Day and Veterans Day.

As of now, there are 3251 flags to be deployed for Labor Day.  Flag delivery is now broken into 85 routes.  Some routes are small with just a street to be serviced, but the largest route serviced by Mike Bevis and Donna Huss is now at 217 flags.

The program needs many more volunteers to sign up.

For each flag holiday, we depend on 140-160 volunteers including the Blue Star mothers, VFW,  CHS wrestling team, and many neighborhood volunteers.  Most needed are volunteers with “flag vehicles” such as SUVs or pickup trucks.

Additional volunteers should contact Tom Novak.

Thanks for your support.

Community Events

  • 8/28/2021, the annual Fishing Derby will be held at RecPlex

Zach Hollingsworth from Freedom Whiskey

Greg Fay introduced Zach Hollingsworth, the founder of Freedom Whiskey Co. The website is HaveaShotofFreedom.com.

Before Launching the Freedom Whiskey Co.

Hollingsworth grew up in Wilmington, Ohio. In 2004, he was recruited and played basketball for Capital University in Bexley, Ohio. In 2008 he earned a bachelor’s degree in education for history from the university. He said he chose this major because it required the least amount of math.

During his junior year of college, Hollingsworth attended a country music concert and Marines were brought on stage. He was inspired and joined the Marine Corp after graduating. He did multiple tours in Afghanistan as a Marine Corps Captain from 2008-2012. He switched to the Reserves in 2012.

Hollingsworth’s former coach at Capital University heard about a job at Centerville High School to coach basketball. Hollingsworth was concerned because he would also have to teach a history class and he had let his teaching certificate expire. He made a phone call to the State Board of Education and told a nice lady his story and she was able to reactivate his certificate for three years. He taught and coached at CHS for 3 school years (2012-2015). His last day in the Marine Corp was on a Friday and his first day of teaching was the following Monday.

In 2016 Hollingsworth earned an M.B.A. in Finance from Ohio University. This is a big shift from trying to avoid math with his undergrad degree.

After teaching he wanted to do something related to the military again. Hollingsworth is currently a contract specialist at WPAFB where he works on the fighter aircraft F-22 Raptor and soon the F-15 Eagle.

Where the Name Freedom Whiskey Co. Comes From

While serving in Afghanistan in the Marine Corps, Hollingsworth fired 650 rounds of artillery into Pakistan. He and his fellow Marines went up to 69 days without a shower. When they arrived at bases to “borrow” some supplies of food and drink, they were teased about how everyone knew they were coming because of the smell.

While having some shots with a friend, they started saying, “Let’s have another shot of freedom.” The phrase stuck with them. They would go around saying, “Have a freedom hamburger”, or “Have a freedom hot dog”. They realized “Freedom” would make a great brand.

Hollingsworth did not know how to make whiskey, but he had a friend in California who did. Hollingsworth designed a logo and named the company Freedom Whiskey Co.

Mission

Freedom Whiskey Co. strives to provide the highest quality bourbon in America while building a family of passionate whiskey drinkers. The company is dedicated to creating whiskey that honors the heritage of our country while providing employment opportunities to veterans who have served or are currently serving, their family members and those who seek to make a difference in general.

Sales History of Freedom Whiskey

Sales of Freedom Whiskey began in 2017. It was exclusively sold online. There were 12 states that allowed online sales of liquor. In 2017, Zach thought at first he was doing well, but he realized he needed distribution. He had been told no by everyone, but he was persistent. He travels 15 days every month He has been able to get into stores in various states. Currently, 3000 stores nationwide sell Freedom Whiskey Co. products.

Freedom Whiskey Co. survived the pandemic because they were not dependent on sales to bars. Many other whiskey brands have gone out of business because the pandemic eliminated their sales. Freedom Whiskey Co. has had greater success because the pandemic has caused liquor store sales to soar.

The country music industry loves his products. Freedom Whiskey Co. sponsors several country music bands.

Sales of Freedom Whiskey for 2021 are on pace to sell $750,000.00.

Donations to Veterans

Freedom Whiskey Co. is profitable, but Hollingsworth has not taken any of the profits. Zach gives away the profits to help veterans and he wants his company to do well so he can give more. Interesting to note is that Hollingsworth no longer drinks alcohol.

One of the organizations he supports is Fisher House Foundation. He said this is a great place to donate money or to volunteer time. They are like the Ronald McDonald House for the military. Fisher Houses provide military families housing close to a loved one in the hospital for an illness, disease or injury.

Freedom Whiskey Co. holds a Veterans Day Celebration each year. Check their website for 2021 details as November approaches. The last party held was in 2019, since 2020 was cancelled because of COVID. He believes it will be held in Miamisburg in 2021. A ticket for $50 will get you admitted and it includes an open bar, catered food and live music. In 2019 the best part of it all was every penny of the $6,600 raised was reserved for Team Red, White, and Blue and their selfless dedication to Veterans and their communities.

Products and Production

Freedom Whiskey Co. products are handcrafted in America. Every bottle has a dog tag on it, with a cool slogan and bottling date. Their plan is that all parts of the product are produced in America. Unfortunately, there is a huge shortage of bottles made in America. Hollingsworth said this is because too many people are not wanting to work right now. The bottles are currently sourced overseas, but they will get them from America again when possible.

Products:

Have A Shot Of Freedom Bourbon Whiskey, crafted following a mash bill of 75% Corn / 21% Rye / 4% Barley. Aged in new charred oak barrels.

Have a Shot of Freedom Cask Strength Bourbon Whiskey, a 120-proof version of their original bourbon.

Freedom Barrel Rested Gin, Floral accents from Juniper, Coriander, Lavender, Lemon Peel, Chamomile, and Calendula flower all blend together perfectly as they’re mellowed out by a 6-month resting process in Freedom Bourbon Barrels.

Uptown Centerville Plans

The City of Centerville is in the process of redesigning Uptown Centerville. This plan now includes Freedom Whiskey Co. Freedom Whiskey Co. is going to construct a 12,000 square foot facility in Uptown Centerville on Franklin Rd West of S.R 48. It will be a distillery, bar and event center. There will be a VIP section for members.

Construction is currently delayed and there is no firm date to begin construction because of the cost of building materials. Steel is back ordered for 5 months. The price of steel and wood is currently out of site. The goal is to be open in June 2022.

To coincide with the Americana Festival each year, the Freedom Whiskey Co. plans to have a free concert performance by a major country music band.

When the Centerville distillery is open you can get a custom dog tag and fill your own bottle.

Thank You Zach Hollingsworth

Thank you, Zach Hollingsworth, for speaking at tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting and telling the story of the path that led to starting the Freedom Whiskey Co.

About CNO 2.0

Greg Fay, the chair of CNO 2.0, said he was so thankful for all the guests and members that came to tonight’s meeting.

Greg Fay said that CNO 2.0 is a club within a club of the Centerville Noon Optimist club. CNO (and CNO 2.0) is a world class service organization. Being a member of either club allows their members all the same opportunities to participate in fundraising and club activities. CNO 2.0 was created about 5 years ago and is very much a part of the 53-year-old Centerville Noon Optimist Club. CNO has given away over $2 million during its history. CNO is a group of like-minded members that are passionate about helping youth and having fun in the process.

The speaker at each 2.0 meeting is someone with a local business success story.

Annual Fundraisers

  • Christmas Tree Lot
  • Avenue of Flags
  • Golf Outing

Major Activities for the youth in our community

  • Build-a-Bear at Children’s Hospital, 3 times a year
  • Fishing Derby in June
  • Kid’s day in the park in August
  • Easter Egg Hunt

CNOtes – Optimist 2.0 February 20, 2020 – Rob Lupidi – Danis Group of Companies

Guests and Members in Attendance

Rob Lupidi
Rocky Matthews
Brian Nicholas
Patrick Arehart
Marge Back
Brandon Barrett
Wayne Christie
Joan Cordonnier
Mike Cordonnier
Brendon Cunningham
Abby Davis
Gary DeMarco
Judy DeMarco
Andy Dickerson
Cheryl Dowd
Emily Duke
Beth Duncan
Greg Fay
Stan Fronzaglia
Cindy Gaboury
Jesse Gaither
Kelly George
Evelyn Griffin
Greg Griffin
Greg Huff
Val Huff
John Kalaman
Paula Kalaman
Mark Karns
Bryan Miller
Carrie Million
Brian Nolan
Tom Novak
Lacey Owens
Debbie Parks
Fred Polizzi
Jean Pummill
Jack Quinlan
Ruthy Quinlan
Vince Reidy
James Reinhard
Bill Shisler
Ashley Simeone
Michelle Tagliamonte
Nick Tarkany
Ron Thompson
Ron Tinnerman

All Photos are Here

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Zinks Meats and Fine Wines at 409 Miamisburg-Centerville Rd, Centerville, Ohio. Thank you to the team at Zinks for the great food and the space.

There was a 50/50 drawing won by James Reinhard.

There were 44 people at the meeting (41 members and 3 guests).

Upcoming CNO 2.0 Meetings

3/19/2020, 12 PM and 5:30 PM, March Madness at Heavier Than Air Brewing Company. Starting at noon you can enjoy free food and watch basketball games. The regular CNO 2.0 Meeting starts at 5:30 PM. The speaker will be Eric Horstman, the founder and president of Flyin’ to the Hoop. The Flyin’ to the Hoop Invitational is an annual tournament of 38 high school teams played at the James S. Trent Arena in Kettering Ohio. Outstanding teams are invited from all over the U.S. The tournament runs for 4 days each year. It was last played 1/17/2020 to 1/20/2020.

Happy Birthday to Stan Fronzaglia

Today was Stan Fronzaglia‘s birthday. All members and guests sang Happy Birthday. It was even in tune! Have a great year Stan!

New member inductions

Greg Griffin inducted two new members to CNO 2.0. Debbie Parks (sponsor Beth Duncan) and Bill Shisler (sponsor Bill Stone). Note that CNO 2.0 members are eligible to participate in anything that a CNO member can, including socials and community events.

Rob Lupidi of Danis

Greg Fay introduced tonight’s speaker, Rob Lupidi. Rob has worked 12 years for The Danis Group of Companies. He has a BS in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Cincinnati. He first worked for Danis as a co-op student. After graduation he worked full time for Danis as a Project Engineer for 3 years. He was promoted to Project Manager and performed that duty for 2 years. For the last 3 years he has been the Director of Business Development. For the past 9 years, he has also been involved in recruiting new employees for Danis.

Founded in 1916 by B.G. Danis, the Danis Group of Companies (Danis) is a third generation, privately owned company based in Dayton, Ohio. The company does a lot of high-profile building around Dayton and the U.S. Danis is one of the top 20 builders in the health care industry. They originally built the UD Arena and just finished the renovation of the arena 2 months ago.

Management and Rob knew he was a people person. Without him asking, they appointed him as the Director of Business Development. He is passionate about people and this position was a way for him to shine. He truly enjoys building relationships.

He loves interviewing potential employees. He loves the ones that have a passion for their work, community or hobby. He wants employees that will be happy. Passion drives everything that good employees do. It helps if you care about your workmanship and being on time. Passion gives purpose and a way to find success.

He has always had a passion for finance. With his new position his boss said you will need to be more involved in the community. Giving back to the community and his passion for finance is what led him to be a Board Member of Junior Achievement USA.

Rob hopes to spend his career at Danis. He likes the company and its attitude. John Danis is the grandson of the founder and has the same great attitude. They want employees to be able to go home each night instead of leaving their families to work jobs far away. They hire good people then get out of their way. The company thinks long term. They provide opportunities for employees to excel.

Rob has noticed recently that a lot of new employees in their industry want to give back to the community. Danis helps employees have time to give back. Every employee is allocated 16 hours a year to volunteer. During their 100-year celebration in 2016, the company started the “Construction Hope Program”.  Through this program the company is currently involved with 40 volunteer organizations and are looking for more ways to be involved in the community.

Rob’s family is large. He is the 8th of 8 children.

Thank Rob Lupidi for sharing your story and passion with us this evening.

About CNO 2.0

CNO 2.0 is a club within a club of the Centerville Noon Optimist club. CNO (and CNO 2.0) is a world class service organization. Our CNO 2.0 club within a club has become the model for Optimist clubs around the world. At regional, national and international meetings we are asked all the time about how our CNO 2.0 club and its meetings work.

Being a member of either club allows their members all the same opportunities to participate in fundraising and club activities. CNO 2.0 started in 2016 and is very much a part of the 51-year-old Centerville Noon Optimist Club. CNO has given away over $2 million during its history. CNO is a group of like-minded members that are passionate about helping youth and having fun in the process.

The speaker at each 2.0 meeting is someone with a local business success story.

The Centerville Noon Optimist and its clubs within a club have annual fundraisers and community activities.

Annual Fundraisers

  • Christmas Tree Lot, located behind the Centerville BMV
  • Avenue of Flags
  • Golf Outing

 

Major Activities for the youth in our community

  • Build-a-Bear at Children’s Hospital, 3 times a year
  • Fishing Derby in June
  • Kid’s day in the park in August
  • Easter Egg hunt
CNO Donations 2013 through September 2019

Click this link to see a summary of the donations our club has made.

Over 50 years, we have donated close to $2,000,000 to our youth community. In the past 6 years, we have donated nearly $700,000.

CNOtes – Optimist 2.0 September 19, 2019 – UD Men’s Basketball Coach Anthony Grant – JD Legends

Guests and Members in Attendance

Katie Boeckman
Bob Burckle
Abby Davis
Donnie Evege
Anthony Grant
Christina Grant
Andy Higgins
Sarah Johnston
Ed Long
Lily McAlpine
Robert Moore
Ray Snedegar
Jill Tinnerman
Carol Weiland
Jack Anderson
Dan Apolito
Diane Arehart
Patrick Arehart
Tim Bemis
Paul Boeckman
Bob Collins
Shelby DiPasquale
Jeff Dundon
Greg Fay
Stan Fronzaglia
Evelyn Griffin
Greg Griffin
Cindy Harris
Mark Karns
Don Kelley
Scott Langer
Nancy Lehren
Chris McAlpine
Jay McAlpine
Kathy McAlpine
Jim Mogan
Denise O’Neil
Laurie Poeppelman
Jean Pummill
Vince Reidy
Wasfi Samman
Jerry Stahley
Bill Stone
Kelly Stone
Ron Tinnerman
Bob Foster
Cherie Gentry
Cheryl Probst
Brent Richburg

All Photos are Here

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

Tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was hosted by CNO member Wasfi Samaan at his establishment, JD Legends Entertainment complex, located 65 Millard Drive, Franklin OH. Thank you to the team at JD Legends for hosting us.

There was a 50/50 drawing won by Stan Fronzaglia.

There were 49 people at the meeting (35 members and 14 guests).

Greg Fay, the chair of CNO 2.0, thanked everyone for attending tonight. He also thanked CNO member Bill Stone for arranging tonight’s speaker, Anthony Grant.

CNO 2.0 Introduction

Greg Fay said that CNO 2.0 is a club within a club of the Centerville Noon Optimist club. We are a world class service organization. Being a member of either club allows their members all the same opportunities to participate in fundraising and club activities. CNO 2.0 was created nearly 3 years ago and is very much a part of the 51-year-old Centerville Noon Optimist Club. CNO has given away over $2 million during its history. CNO is a group of like-minded members that are passionate about helping youth and having fun in the process.

The speaker at each 2.0 meeting is someone with a local business success story.

Future meetings will be at Old Scratch Pizza in October or November and at Zink’s again soon.

Annual Fundraisers

  • Christmas Tree Lot
  • Avenue of Flags
  • Golf Outing

Major Activities for the youth in our community

  • Build-a-Bear at Children’s Hospital, 3 times a year
  • Fishing Derby in June
  • Kid’s day in the park in August
  • Easter Egg hunt

Upcoming Community Events

Denise O’Neil, chair of the Haunted trail event, said that the Haunted Trail event will be at Forest Field Park on 10/15/2019 and 10/16/2019. It is about a 1-mile walk and we need more volunteers for trail guides. There are also other volunteers needed to help with parking, refreshments and many other activities to pull this event off.

UD Flyers Coach Anthony Grant

Bill Stone introduced the 20th head coach of the University of Dayton’s Men’s Basketball team, Anthony Grant. Christina Grant, his wife, accompanied him to our meeting tonight.

Coach Grant thanked us for having him here to speak today. He said he was asked to talk about the path his life took to get to where he is now as head coach of UD’s Basketball team since 2017.

Anthony graduated from Miami Senior High School in Miami, Florida in 1983. At the age of 17, Anthony somehow convinced his parents he would be well taken care of in Dayton while attending the University of Dayton. This was not simple because they valued education way more than sports. He was a business major at UD. Don Donoher was his coach at UD and Anthony knows coach Donoher has been there for him.

Coach Grant tells his players that education is the most important thing. He said, “Eventually the ball stops bouncing.”

After graduating from UD, he played semi-pro basketball for a while. Soon, he got a call from a friend to be an assistant coach for JV at his former H.S., Miami Senior High School.

He liked the opportunity to coach because it was a way to still stay involved in basketball and see kids benefit from playing. For a lot of kids their best chance to succeed in school was to learn structure and discipline and to dream. His aim is to show them what a difference college can make to their future. He enjoys making a difference in their lives.

He coached at his high school until he was 26. He left when he was offered a head coach at another local high school. He credits numerous relationships for creating the paths he has taken to get coaching opportunities.

He was assistant coach at Marshall from 1994 to 1996.

He was assistant to Billy Donovan at the University of Florida for 10 years. The Gators won the 2006 NCAA title.

His first college head coach opportunity was a at VCU for 3 years. Then he was head coach at Alabama for 6 years. After that ended, he and his family had resolved to move back to Gainesville. Before they moved though, he got an opportunity to be assistant coach for the Oklahoma City Thunder.

After hearing that Archie Miller left UD in 2017, he had not thought at all about being the new coach. However, he got a phone call from Neil Sullivan, the UD Director of Athletics, to discuss the possibility. After a couple more days he was offered the job. Anthony had concerns that too much of the reason he was being offered the job was for being a UD Alumni. He asked Neil to be sure they were basing their decision on what is best for the Flyers, not what is best for himself. Neil assured Anthony that he is the best choice.

Anthony said he has seen many areas of our country. He says what we have here in Dayton is truly special. The Dayton fans are the difference he said.

He discussed sporting events. He said at the end of the day, winning matters. He said, “Everyone wants to win.” Beyond winning though sports are important for the community. It is something that gets people to come together. There is joy in watching a kid see a game for the first time.

Sporting events can be a great escape. Watching a game can distract you for a few hours from having to deal with issues you might be having. He tells his players that they are making a difference in people’s lives.

At UD this coming season, Anthony said that there are 11 players who are on scholarship at UD. He thinks they now have some depth. They have the option to have 13 scholarship players, but they made a conscience choice to only have 11. He said it is hard to play more than 11 guys and it is also difficult to keep 11 guys happy, let alone 13.

Practice will start on October 1, 2019. Before October 1st, players are limited to 8 hours per week. They spend an hour a day for 4 days a week in the weight room and they also spend 2 hours for 2 days a week on the court.

Anthony and Christina’s two oldest children are currently students at UD. His family is happy here and he plans to stay with UD for quite a while.

He said that team culture is very important. If you have a great game plan it won’t work if the culture is not right. There must be integrity, commitment, and teamwork for a team to succeed.

Anthony’s goal is to have championship caliber teams. It is important to get into the NCAA tournament as often as possible. The more times you are in it, the better the chance of winning it. You just might get the right matchups and the right games and win it.

He was asked who the team captains will be this year. He said the guys get to vote on this.

Anthony said the players know what the standards are and what we want to achieve. All the players must sacrifice and realize they are better when working together. Good teams become great teams when the players do what the coach requests which can mean giving up court time.

He noted that this year is the only year he will have this team. Every year the team needs dynamic changes, so adjustments are made every season.

Jack Anderson asked coach Grant which players were the most difficult to deal with as their coach. Anthony said some players came to mind, but he declined to share those thoughts.

After Anthony was done, Bill Stone spoke again and thanked Anthony for the great talk and for taking the time. Bill also said that after 3 years of construction, the newly remodeled University of Dayton Stadium will be rededicated on November 9, 2019. It is the 50th anniversary of the UD Stadium.

CNO Donations 2013 through June 2019

Click this link to see a summary of the donations our club has made.

Over 50 years, we have donated close to $2,000,000 to our youth community. In the past 6 years, we have donated nearly $700,000.

CNOtes – Optimist 2.0 August 15, 2019 – Nick Tarkany – Heavier Than Air Brewing Co.

Guests and Members in Attendance

Peter DeMott
Gary Poeppelman
Frank Weikel
Marcia Tarkany
Nancy Anderson
Pat Arehart
Patrick Arehart
Tim Clemmer
Joan Cordonnier
Mike Cordonnier
Judy DeMarco
Emily Duke
Greg Fay
Stan Fronzaglia
Cindy Gaboury
Jesse Gaither
Jerry Gerhards
Karin Gilstrap
Cindy Harris
Kevin Jackson
Martha Jackson
Bryan Miller
Tom Novak
Laurie Poeppelman
Jack Quinlan
Ruth Quinlan
Ashley Simeone
Chris Smith
Michelle Tagliamonte
Nick Tarkany
Ron Tinnerman
Jayne Weikel
Jon Werts

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Heavier than Air Brewing Company. Thank you to CNO Member Nick Tarkany and his team for allowing us to take over their bar tonight.

There was a 50/50 drawing won by Stan Fronzaglia.

We had 28 members and 4 guests in attendance.

CNO 2.0 Introduction

Greg Fay said that CNO 2.0 is a club within a club of the Centerville Noon Optimist club. We are a world class service organization. Being a member of either club allows their members all the same opportunities to participate in fundraising and club activities. CNO 2.0 was created nearly 3 years ago and is very much a part of the 51-year-old Centerville Optimist Club. CNO has given away over $2 million during its history. CNO is a group of like-minded members that are passionate about help youth and having fun in the process.

The speaker at each 2.0 meeting is someone with a local business success story.

Future meetings will be at Old Scratch pizza in October or November and at Zinks again soon.

Annual Fundraisers

  • Christmas Tree Lot
  • Avenue of Flags
  • Golf Outing

Major Activities for the youth in our community

  • Build-a-Bear at Children’s Hospital, 3 times a year
  • Fishing Derby in June
  • Kid’s day in the park in August
  • Easter Egg hunt

Announcements

Tom Novak, chair of the Avenue of Flags, said that we now have over 2300 flags to deliver. They are broken up into 62 routes.

Greg Fay announced that CNO 2.0 will be providing the food for the Centerville Quarterback club at the first CHS home game on 9/13/2019. All members and their guests are welcome to attend.

Greg Fay said that Wasfi Saaman, the owner of J.D. Legends, will again be providing a special link for tickets to a concert for CNO members. The “Prince Experience” will be on September 14, 2019. Proceeds from the tickets will be donated back to the CNO club.

 

Nick Tarkany – Owner, Heavier than Air Brewing Company

Greg Fay introduced tonight’s speaker, Nick Tarkany, the owner of Heavier than Air Brewing Company.

Nick told us the story of his journey to open his beer brewing company and tap room.

Opening a brewery is not for the faint of heart. He got into it by accident when his college age son wanted to brew beer. The process made a complete mess of the household stove, but they kept trying. Friends and local business owners like Doubledays wanted him to brew larger quantities and sell it.

About five years ago, he took his stout to a wedding. They told him the only the gift they wanted from him was beer. Most of the female guests at the reception were drinking wine. A couple tried the stout beer he brought, and the word spread until everyone was drinking beer instead of wine. He started thinking people really do like his beer.

His background is in the machine tool and die industry, but Nick has an affinity for aviation history. He is also a pilot and an aviation geek. The theme for the endeavor was easy to come by living in Dayton with all the Wright Brothers history. The Wright Brothers claim to fame is that they created a “Heavier than Air” flying machine.

The first step he took was to scope out locations for the company. He looked at about 16 different locations. There were several location candidates considered along the way, but they were taken before he chose to go with the candidate. The ultimate location is where they still are today, at 497 Miamisburg-Centerville Rd in Centerville Ohio.

During his presentation, he had a slide show of before and after pictures of the construction of the space.

He had no idea how much effort and different companies and government inspections were involved in starting a brewing company. It took a year to do the build out in the existing location. It involved planning and construction of electric systems, drains, gas lines, audio/video systems and more. The numerous inspection processes were especially grueling. There were 24 permits and over 35 inspections. He found out the hard way that you have to schedule the first and second rough inspections before the inspector will sign off on the final inspection even if the system is already complete.

Getting a final approval to sell beer never came with any guarantees. You must go through all the effort and expense and you might not get approved. He described the process as a real leap of faith.

After leasing and remodeling the space for a year, Ohio finally gave him his license and he could finally start making beer and open the tap room. Then other struggles occurred like getting the point of sale system set up.

Until their license was approved, they were not allowed to use or even fully setup the large-scale brewing systems. Once their license was approved, they then had to figure out how to scale from brewing 5 gallons to 65 gallons. The ingredients are not proportional. This was another adventure in and of itself.

His brother and two sons are involved. One son lives in Portland and the other in New York. They handle the marketing and product development.

Today was his 38th wedding anniversary. He thanked his wife Marcia for all her support and patience. They both still remember the first words he said to her when they met 39 years ago. They were at a party and he said to her, “Throw me a beer.”

He thanked Centerville Noon Optimist member Tom Novak for being an inspiration. He was his history teacher and track coach. At tonight’s meeting, he still called Tom, “Mr. Novak”.

He said that service is paramount. He knows for customers it is about the experience and quality of the beer that keep them coming back.

He thanked us for coming and listening to his story.

After Nick’s presentation, CNO member Cindy Gaboury thanked him for all the other nonprofit work Nick does. He hosts numerous events and gives back to the community.

Thank you, Nick, for sharing your story and tap room.

Beer Competition Awards

  • Gold Medal at the 2019 US Open Beer Championship in the English Ales category for their “Balloon Factory ESB”. This is one of the largest international beer competitions.
  • Gold Medals at the 2018 Ohio Craft Brewers Cup for their “McCook Bound American Stout” and “Balloon Factory ESB”.

Next CNO 2.0 Meeting

The next meeting will be September 19, 2019 at JD Legends in Franklin, OH. The speaker will be University of Dayton Men’s Basketball coach Anthony Grant. Remember, CNO 2.0 meetings are always the third Thursday of the month at 5:30 PM at a local bar or restaurant.

CNO Donations 2013 through June 2019

Click this link to see a summary of the donations our club has made.

Over 50 years, we have donated close to $2,000,000 to our youth community. In the past 6 years, we have donated nearly $700,000.

 

 

CNOtes – Optimist 2.0 July 18, 2019 – Jenell Ross – President, Bob Ross Auto Group

Guests and Members in Attendance

Renee Arana
Denise Christie
Beth Fowler
Kayleigh Jackson
Gary McDowell
Jack Quinlin
Ruthy Quinlin
Sham Reddy
Jenell Ross
Angie Tilinghast
Nancy Anderson
Diane Arehart
Pat Arehart
Marge Back
Wayne Christie
Brendan Cunningham
Gary DeMarco
Judy DeMarco
Emily Duke
Stan Fronzaglia
Jesse Gaither
Christy Gariety
Jerry Gebhards
Renee Glenn
Evelyn Griffin
Greg Griffin
Gary Hansen
Donna Huss
Martha Jackson
Nancy Lehren
Brian Nolan
Tom Novak
Laurie Poeppelman
Jean Pummill
Vince Reidy
Brent Richburg
Deb Saunders
Ashley Simeone
Bill Stone
Kelly Stone
Ron Tinnerman
Frank Weikel
Jayne Weikel
Jon Werts
Suzanne Werts

All Photos from the Meeting are here

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Chappy’s Social House at 880 Washington Village Drive. Thank you to the team at Chappy’s for hosting us.

There was a 50/50 drawing won by Kayleigh Jackson.

There were 45 people at the meeting (35 members and 10 guests).

Jesse Gaither, member of CNO 2.0 committee, thanked everyone for attending tonight. Jesse also mentioned our 3 fundraisers. We just finished our golf outing this week. We raise money from the Avenue of Flags program. We also sell Christmas Trees each year behind the Centerville Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

Jenell Ross from Bob Ross Auto Group

Jesse Gaither introduced Jenell Ross, the president of Bob Ross Auto Group. Jenell is a graduate of Emory University and a trustee at U.D. She is a chairperson for the Federal Reserve in Cincinnati. After her mother’s death from breast cancer, she and her daughters started the Norma J. Ross Memorial Foundation funding programs that raise breast cancer awareness, provide patient aid and research, and support local youth education.  The slogan “Pink Ribbon Driven” is also the name of their website. https://pinkribbondriven.org/

Jenell’s father, Bob Ross, purchased his first dealership in Richmond, Indiana 45 years ago. In 1979, he purchased the Mercedes and Buick dealership on Loop Road in Centerville, Ohio. Bob Ross was the first African American to own a Mercedes dealership.

Jenell attended Centerville schools and graduated from the Miami Valley School.

She has always loved automobiles. She would hang around the dealership and would work in various areas. After graduating from Emory University, she became an official employee and was able to work with her father for 5 years before his early passing at the age of 62 in 1997.

Jenell explained that when the owner of a dealership passes it is typically a nervous time at a dealership. There is normally a mass exodus of good employees when the owner passes. This was not the case at Bob Ross. The employees were always treated well and there was a smooth transition. Her mother, Norma J. Ross, became president, and Jenell became the chief operating officer of the company. They have fun sometimes. They dress up for Halloween, Celebrate Christmas and do other fun group outings with employees and their families.

 

While president, Norma added the Hummer Franchise. Then the recession hit and made it very difficult to keep the dealerships running well in Dayton. The loss of NCR and DHL reduced the pool of customers. They spent a lot of energy trying to keep people motivated during this time. Some of their decisions were not perfect. They added dealerships for Alpha Romeo and Fiat, but they didn’t work out and they dropped the brands after about 1.5 years.

They survived the recession and currently have close to 100 employees. Even with the loss of GM manufacturing jobs in Dayton, they continue to be staunch supporters of GMC and Buick.

Dealer ownership statistics

  • There are 18,000 new car dealers in the US
  • 1000 are owned by females
  • 60 are owned by minority females
  • 4 are owned by African American females

Jenell took over day to day operations at the age of 27. She also became the representative of the company at various conventions and meetings held throughout the year. Her first few meetings were a bit interesting. She is not the typical face of the owner of a dealership. Still, 22 years later some attendees make some bad assumptions about who she is. She has a little fun with assumptions and tries to use it for education.

She is proud of the Norma J. Ross Foundation. It has become her side job. Part of the foundation’s purpose is to help pay for mammograms that many women cannot afford. They have trademarked the slogan “Pink Ribbon Drive”.

Jenell shared her view of Keys to Success in any Business

  • Have good people helping you; you need to rely on the fact that someone else can help when you need it
  • No one person can do everything, it is a Team effort
  • Have respect for your fellow workers
  • She doesn’t ask someone to do something she wouldn’t be willing to do herself
  • Just because you’re the boss doesn’t mean you are always right; everyone makes mistakes, so learn from them and try not to repeat them
  • Have self-confidence because not everyone you meet will want you to succeed
  • Be willing to learn more about you’re your area of expertise
  • Always be prepared (something her mother Norma always said)

In her closing she gave some thoughts about her success and her company’s success. No manufacturer is making a bad vehicle anymore. Success is about helping people get a vehicle that they want. There are a lot of choices in the automotive world. Business owners should be ethical and moral in everything they do.  The Centerville community has been great for them and she appreciates her customers and gives back to the community.

She didn’t start her company, however, for many years, she went to many seminars and was constantly learning about the industry and was therefore well prepared to take over at the age of 27.

To be an entrepreneur you need to be a risk taker. Only 13% of the workforce are entrepreneurs. That means 13% of the workforce is doing something the other 87% don’t want to do.

No matter what your career path, continue to challenge yourself to reach new levels of success. The most important thing is to have fun at whatever you choose to do. Remember that only you can make yourself happy.

Thank you, Jenell, for taking the time to come and speak to us today! After her presentation, Tom Novak thanked Jenell for generously donating loaner vehicles to help with Avenue of Flags and the Christmas Tree Lot.

 

 

CNOtes – Optimist 2.0 June 20, 2019 – Ohio Supreme Court Justice Sharon L. Kennedy

Guests and Members in Attendance

Michelle Apolito
Denise Christie
Amelia Cordonnier
Colton Dickerson
Gwen Dickerson
Nora Dickerson
Jerry Gehards
Sharon Kennedy
Joe Poelking
Courtney Taylor
Miles Taylor
Frank Weikel
Dan Apolito
Diane Arehart
Pat Arehart
Marge Back
Harry Bossey
Alan Brown
Jeff Brown
Wayne Christie
Joan Cordonnier
Mike Cordonnier
Brendan Cunningham
Andy Dickerson
Erin Dickerson
Emily Duke
Greg Fay
Stan Fronzaglia
Jesse Gaither
Evelyn Griffin
Greg Griffin
Mark Karns
Scott Langer
Vida McDowell
Brian Nolan
Jean Pummill
Brent Richburg
Ashley Simeone
Gary Smiga
Jayne Weikel
Jerry Stahley

All Photos from the Meeting are here

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was at Poelking Lanes South in Miami Township, Ohio. Thank you to Joe Poelking, the owner of the venue, for donating the VIP Bowling Lounge for our meeting with complimentary bowling and for obtaining and introducing tonight’s speaker, Ohio Supreme Court Judge Sharon L. Kennedy.

There was a 50/50 drawing won by Greg Fay who donated it back to the Optimist International Foundation.

There were 41 people at the meeting (29 members and 12 guests).

Greg Fay, the chair of CNO 2.0, thanked everyone for attending tonight. He introduced and thanked tonight’s host, Joe Poelking.

New Member Induction

President-elect Greg Griffin inducted CNO 2.0’s newest member, Alan Brown.

Speaker tonight was Ohio Supreme Court Judge Sharon L. Kennedy

Tonight’s venue host Joe Poelking introduced our speaker, Ohio Supreme Court Judge Sharon L. Kennedy. Prior to serving on the Ohio Supreme Court she served as a Judge at the Butler County Court of Common Pleas Domestic Relations Division since 1999. From 2005 until December of 2012 she served as the administrative judge of the Division.

Judge Kennedy came to speak to us tonight about The Ohio Judicial System and how it impacts your life. She handed out her booklet “The Ohio Judicial System & You”.

Part of the checks and balances of power in the U.S. and Ohio is the judicial system.

There are several types of courts with varying purposes in Ohio.

Mayor’s courts handle things like traffic tickets and misdemeanors. They don’t have trials. The cases they can’t hear are transferred to other courts.

Municipal courts are the worker bees, hearing as many as 3 million cases per year in Ohio.

The Court of Claims hears cases of civil actions filed against the state.

The Court of Common Pleas includes the Probate court. She called the Probate Court the Happy and Sad court. They handle adoptions as well as handling estates.

There are 12 Appeals Courts. There are as many as 3 million cases heard in the Ohio courts system. Only about 7000 to 9000 are appealed. The court system is nowhere near perfect. The number of appeals cases should be higher. The number is as low as it is because it is very expensive to appeal a case.

The Ohio Supreme Court hears about 2200 cases per year.

A detailed description and chart of the Ohio Judicial Structure can be read here.

Elected Judges in Ohio

Ohio in 1851 was unstable and essentially bankrupt. Until 1851, Ohio judges could be fired, and they were every time new leadership was elected. Judge Kennedy said we should read about the great debates of 1851. She found these debates to be very exciting. The debates led to 6-year terms for Ohio Supreme Court judges and helped stabilize Ohio.

Judge Kennedy told us that as citizens of Ohio, we are the judicial system since we choose the judges. She said we should know our judges. Judges now are more accessible than ever. She said we should know who all of our government representatives are. You should have them on your speed dial and call them when you want them to do something or to do something different.

There are no term limits for a judge, but you cannot run for judge if you will be 70 or older before your term begins.

Thank you, Judge Kennedy, for taking the time to come and speak to us today.

CNOtes – Optimist 2.0 May 16, 2019 – Dan Apolito – Co-Owner Archer’s (and Club Member)

Guests and Members in Attendance

Michelle Apolito
Abbe Devore
Logan Fay
Karin Gilstrap
Gary Poeppelman
Dan Apolito
Diane Arehart
Pat Arehart
Marge Back
Katie Calloway
Bob Crawford
Brendan Cunningham
Judy DeMarco
Emily Duke
Beth Duncan
Greg Fay
Evelyn Griffin
Greg Griffin
Gary Hansen
Cindy Harris
Donna Huss
John Kalaman
Mark Karns
Brian Nolan
Tom Novak
Laurie Poeppelman
Jean Pummill
Brent Richburg
Ashley Simeone
Nick Tarkany
Ron Tinnerman
Jayne Weikel

All Photos from the Meeting are here

CNO 2.0 Venue and Details

The venue for tonight’s CNO 2.0 meeting was Heavier than Air Brewing Company. Thank you to CNO member Nick Tarkany and his team for allowing us to take over their bar tonight.

There was a 50/50 drawing won by CNO member Judy DeMarco. With the raffle, $45 was raised for Optimist International.

We had 27 members and 5 guests in attendance.

Awards

President Donna Huss presented award pins for sponsoring new members to CNO 2.0 members Cindy Harris, Emily Duke and Nick Tarkany.

New Member Inductions

Donna Huss inducted Mark Karns and Bob Crawford as the two newest members of CNO 2.0. That makes them part of CNO with all the same rights and privileges. Regardless of which CNO club you are in, you are welcome to volunteer for all fundraisers, community events and to participate on any committee.

CNO 2.0 Introduction and Announcements

Greg Fay, CNO 2.0 committee chair, gave us a summary about the club. He thanked everyone for coming tonight. He said it is great to be part of a club with some members who have over 30 years of service experience with the club.

Beth Duncan, co-chair of the Social Committee, said the Social Committee is looking for new members. Remember that CNO 2.0 members can join any committee that a standard CNO member can.

Dan Apolito Co-Owner of Archer’s Tavern Restaurants

Greg Fay introduced Dan Apolito, the co-owner of 2 Archer’s Tavern Restaurants (Centerville and Kettering) and The Stone House Tavern in Waynesville. Dan is a member of CNO 2.0.

Dan told us about the path that led him to owning three popular restaurants.

Dan was born in Bellbrook where his father was a police officer. At age 6 he moved to Centerville. His father taught at CHS and UD and had the Optimist Creed hanging in his home office. Dan attended CHS and worked at J.Alexander’s to help pay for his Bachelor’s degree in Management from the University of Dayton.

Dan was involved from the beginning of the restaurant at Yankee Trace golf course.

He interned at Disney World and learned a lot about great customer service from that experience.

Years after leaving J.Alexander’s, they invited him back to be involved in the management of their restaurants. The company moved him to Memphis, Louisville, Cleveland and finally back to Centerville where he and his wife Michelle wanted to raise their family. It was going pretty well except the manager of the Centerville J.Alexander’s had no plans to retire any time soon and he wanted that job.

Applebee’s reached out to him. He spent 8.5 years with the Applebee’s, the first 2 years at the Springfield restaurant and the last 6.5 years as the area director over several restaurants.

After Applebee’s he tried being a financial advisor, but he loved the service industry. He and Mike Fullenkamp (Dan’s partner in the restaurants) had discussions while he was a financial advisor about opening a restaurant together. They thought Centerville could support another restaurant. The idea was to blend the menu of Applebee’s with the same focus on great customer service that J.Alexander’s had.

Dan said he is often asked where they got the name Archer’s Tavern. They were about to open the first restaurant and they still didn’t have a name. They started with around 100 names and narrowed to 15 and still couldn’t decide. Dan decided to go to the Centerville Library and read a book written by the Centerville Historical Society titled, “Sense of Place”. There was a restaurant a long time ago in Centerville called, “Sign of the Cross King’s Tavern”. The owner of the restaurant’s last name was Archer. The restaurant was better known as “Archer’s Place”.

Dan and Mike always try to support the community. If you come in and say you live in the area and need a donation, they almost always help with gift cards or some other way.

Another question Dan is often asked is about the origin of the hamburger with peanut butter called, “Sticky Burger”. Dan is the food guy of the partnership, his partner heads up other areas. However, Mike suggested why don’t we put something weird on the menu. Let’s put peanut butter on a burger and see what happens. They sell tons of “Sticky Burgers”.

Dan credits great customer service for their success. They train their servers to help each other. Someone will greet you within 15-20 seconds of being seated. The goal is to keep customers coming back. If ever there is a problem with food or service, any employee has the authority to make it right without having to go and get approval.

Thanks Dan Apolito for sharing your story with us today!